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Inequality and mobility of household incomes in Europe: evidence from the ECHP

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  • Gerhard Riener

Abstract

In this article we want to shed light on two aspects of income mobility: relative total income mobility using the estimator by Fields and Ok (1999) and equalization of long-run incomes measured by the index of Fields (2009). The cross country comparison shows a negative relationship between total relative mobility and long-run income equalization, this result is contrary to the intuition given by Shorrocks (1978a) who stated that higher relative mobility will cause higher equalization of incomes when the accounting period is extended.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerhard Riener, 2012. "Inequality and mobility of household incomes in Europe: evidence from the ECHP," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 279-288, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:44:y:2012:i:3:p:279-288
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2010.505555
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Gottschalk & Enrico Spolaore, 2002. "On the Evaluation of Economic Mobility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 191-208.
    2. Cowell, Frank & Schluter, Christian, 1998. "Income mobility : a robust approach," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2210, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Luis Ayala & Mercedes Sastre, 2004. "Europe vs. the United States: is there a trade-off between mobility and inequality?," Journal of Income Distribution, Journal of Income Distribution, vol. 13(1-2), pages 4-4, March-Jun.
    4. R. Bénabou & E. Ok, 2000. "Mobility as Progressivity: Ranking Income Processes According to Equality of Opportunity," Princeton Economic Theory Papers 00f1, Economics Department, Princeton University.
    5. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-990, October.
    6. Fields, Gary S & Ok, Efe A, 1999. "Measuring Movement of Incomes," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(264), pages 455-471, November.
    7. Jarvis, Sarah & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1998. "How Much Income Mobility Is There in Britain?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 428-443, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yekaterina Chzhen & Emilia Toczydlowska & Sudhanshu Handa & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2016. "Child Poverty Dynamics and Income Mobility in Europe," Papers inwopa840, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Fonseca, Miguel A. & Normann, Hans-Theo, 2012. "Explicit vs. tacit collusion—The impact of communication in oligopoly experiments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1759-1772.
    3. Aysit Tansel & Basak Dalgic & Aytekin Güven, 2014. "Wage Inequality and Wage Mobility in Turkey," ERC Working Papers 1414, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Nov 2014.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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