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Household Income Mobility in India: 1993-2011

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  • Mehtabul Azam

Abstract

Using nationally representative longitudinal survey, the paper examines the income mobility among rural (urban) Indian households over 1993-2004 and 2004-2011 (2004-2011). The paper finds mobility estimates that mirror the social hierarchy: Forward Hindu Caste (FHC) households experienced the highest (lowest) upward (downward) mobility. Considerable gaps between FHC households and households from the disadvantaged social groups remain in upward/downward mobility even after controlling for households characteristics. The paper finds lower conditional gaps in both upward/downward mobility in rural India for the disadvantaged groups (except for Muslims) over 2004-2011 compared to 1993-2004. For Muslims, the gaps in downward mobility increased over 2004-11 compared to 1993-2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Mehtabul Azam, 2016. "Household Income Mobility in India: 1993-2011," Working Papers id:11457, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:11457
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    intra-generational; income mobility; social groups; scheduled castes/tribes; India.;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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