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The Irrelevance of National Strategies? Rural Poverty Dynamics in States and Regions of India, 1993-2005


  • Krishna, Anirudh
  • Shariff, Abusaleh


Summary Examining panel data for more than 13,000 rural Indian households over the 12-year period 1993-94 to 2004-05 shows that two parallel and opposite flows regularly reconfigure the national stock of poverty. Some formerly poor people have escaped poverty; concurrently, some formerly non-poor people have fallen into poverty. These simultaneous inward and outward flows are asymmetric in terms of reasons. One set of reasons is associated with the flow into poverty, but a different set of reasons is associated with the flow out of poverty. Both sets of reasons vary considerably across and within states. No factor matters consistently across all states of India. Standardized national policies do not represent the best use of available resources. Diverse threats and different opportunities must be identified and tackled at the sub-national level.

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  • Krishna, Anirudh & Shariff, Abusaleh, 2011. "The Irrelevance of National Strategies? Rural Poverty Dynamics in States and Regions of India, 1993-2005," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 533-549, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:4:p:533-549

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Brück, Tilman & Esenaliev, Damir & Kroeger, Antje & Kudebayeva, Alma & Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Steiner, Susan, 2014. "Household survey data for research on well-being and behavior in Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 819-835.
    2. A. Amarender Reddy, 2014. "Rural Labor Markets: insights from Indian villages," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 21(1), pages 107-136, June.
    3. Ayuya, Oscar I. & Gido, Eric O. & Bett, Hillary K. & Lagat, Job K. & Kahi, Alexander K. & Bauer, Siegfried, 2015. "Effect of Certified Organic Production Systems on Poverty among Smallholder Farmers: Empirical Evidence from Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 27-37.
    4. Dang,Hai-Anh H. & Lanjouw,Peter F., 2015. "Poverty dynamics in India between 2004 and 2012 : insights from longitudinal analysis using synthetic panel data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7270, The World Bank.
    5. Harris, David & Orr, Alastair, 2014. "Is rainfed agriculture really a pathway from poverty?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 84-96.
    6. Thorat, Amit & Vanneman, Reeve & Desai, Sonalde & Dubey, Amaresh, 2017. "Escaping and Falling into Poverty in India Today," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 413-426.
    7. Mehtabul Azam, 2016. "Household Income Mobility in India, 1993-2011," Economics Working Paper Series 1705, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    8. Dhongde, Shatakshee, 2017. "Measuring Segregation of the Poor: Evidence from India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 111-123.
    9. Paola A. Barrientos Q. & Niels-Hugo Blunch & Nabanita Datta Gupta, 2015. "Income Convergence and the Flow out of Poverty in India, 1994-2005," Economics Working Papers 2015-09, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.


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