IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Volatility spillovers and contagion: an empirical analysis of structural changes in emerging market volatility

  • Aymen Ben Rejeb

    ()

    (Faculty of Economics and Management of Mahdia, University of Monastir, Tunisia)

This paper aims to test the international transmission of stock market volatility and the risk of contagion among a sample of emerging and developed markets through a methodology rarely used in this context. This methodology, developed by Bai and Perron (1998, 2003), is based on the determination of structural breakpoints. Our empirical strategy consists in identifying similarities in the dates of structural breaks and in comparing them with the occurrence dates of financial crises in order to test respectively the international transmission of volatility and the risk of contagion. Empirical results lead to very interesting conclusions. First, we find that the transmission of volatility is effective between the emerging markets and between them and the developed ones. Second, we show that the geographical proximity has a crucial effect in the transmission of volatility. Finally, a comparison between the occurrence dates of financial crises and the different structural breakpoint dates allows us to notice that there is an important analogy between them. This proves that the financial shocks are transmitted from one market to another during the periods of crises.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2013/Volume33/EB-13-V33-I1-P6.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 33 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 56-71

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00821
Contact details of provider:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Taufiq Choudhry, 2004. "International Transmission of Stock Returns and Volatility : Empirical Comparison Between Friends and Foes," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 40(4), pages 33-52, July.
  2. Xiaoqing Eleanor Xu & Hung-Gay Fung, 2002. "Information Flows across Markets: Evidence from China-Backed Stocks Dual-Listed in Hong Kong and New York," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 37(4), pages 563-588, November.
  3. Nikkinen, Jussi & Omran, Mohammad M. & Sahlstrom, Petri & Aijo, Janne, 2008. "Stock returns and volatility following the September 11 attacks: Evidence from 53 equity markets," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 27-46.
  4. Perron, P. & Bai, J., 1995. "Estimating and Testing Linear Models with Multiple Structural Changes," Cahiers de recherche 9552, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  5. Aymen Ben Rejeb & Ousama Ben Salha, 2013. "Financial crises and emerging stock markets volatility: do internal factors matter?," Macroeconomics and Finance in Emerging Market Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 146-165, March.
  6. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Pittis, Nikitas & Spagnolo, Nicola, 2002. "Testing for Causality-in-Variance: An Application to the East Asian Markets," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(3), pages 235-45, July.
  7. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
  8. BAI, Jushan & PERRON, Pierre, 1998. "Computation and Analysis of Multiple Structural-Change Models," Cahiers de recherche 9807, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  9. Ranciere, Romain & Tornell, Aaron & Westermann, Frank, 2006. "Decomposing the effects of financial liberalization: Crises vs. growth," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 3331-3348, December.
  10. Ben Salha Ousama & Bouazizi Tarek & Aloui Chaker, 2012. "Financial Liberalization, Banking Crises and Economic Growth: The Case of South Mediterranean Countries," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 12(3), pages 1-22, September.
  11. Geert Bekaert & Campbell R. Harvey, 2003. "Market Integration and Contagion," NBER Working Papers 9510, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1999. "Are Asian stock market fluctuations due mainly to intra-regional contagion effects? Evidence based on Asian emerging stock markets," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 7(3-4), pages 251-282, August.
  13. Ali F. Darrat & Omar M. Benkato, 2003. "Interdependence and Volatility Spillovers Under Market Liberalization: The Case of Istanbul Stock Exchange," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30, pages 1089-1114.
  14. Aggarwal, Reena & Inclan, Carla & Leal, Ricardo, 1999. "Volatility in Emerging Stock Markets," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(01), pages 33-55, March.
  15. Eichengreen, Barry & Arteta, Carlos, 2000. "Banking Crises in Emerging Markets: Presumptions and Evidence," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt3pk9t1h2, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
  16. Constanza Martinez & Manuel Ramirez, 2011. "International propagation of shocks: an evaluation of contagion effects for some Latin American countries," Macroeconomics and Finance in Emerging Market Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 213-233, December.
  17. Bertero, Elisabetta & Mayer, Colin, 1990. "Structure and performance: Global interdependence of stock markets around the crash of October 1987," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1155-1180, September.
  18. Warren Bailey & Haitao Li & Connie X. Mao & Rui Zhong, 2003. "Regulation Fair Disclosure and Earnings Information: Market, Analyst, and Corporate Responses," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 58(6), pages 2487-2514, December.
  19. Charles, Amelie & Darne, Olivier, 2006. "Large shocks and the September 11th terrorist attacks on international stock markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 683-698, July.
  20. Maria Kasch-Haroutounian & Simon Price, 2001. "Volatility in the transition markets of Central Europe," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 93-105.
  21. Kearney, Colm, 2000. "The determination and international transmission of stock market volatility," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 11(1-2), pages 31-52.
  22. Phylaktis, Kate & Ravazzolo, Fabiola, 2002. "Measuring financial and economic integration with equity prices in emerging markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 879-903, November.
  23. Kristin J. Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 2002. "No Contagion, Only Interdependence: Measuring Stock Market Comovements," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(5), pages 2223-2261, October.
  24. McAleer, Michael & Nam, Jason Chee Wei, 2005. "Testing for contagion in ASEAN exchange rates," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 517-525.
  25. Kristin Forbes & Roberto Rigobon, 2000. "Contagion in Latin America: Definitions, Measurement, and Policy Implications," NBER Working Papers 7885, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Edwards, Sebastian & Susmel, Raul, 2001. "Volatility dependence and contagion in emerging equity markets," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 505-532, December.
  27. Karolyi, G Andrew, 1995. "A Multivariate GARCH Model of International Transmissions of Stock Returns and Volatility: The Case of the United States and Canada," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(1), pages 11-25, January.
  28. Leachman, Lori L. & Francis, Bill, 1996. "Equity market return volatility: Dynamics and transmission among the G-7 countries," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 27-52.
  29. Sebastian Edwards & Raul Susmel, 2003. "Interest-Rate Volatility in Emerging Markets," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(2), pages 328-348, May.
  30. King, Mervyn A & Wadhwani, Sushil, 1990. "Transmission of Volatility between Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 5-33.
  31. Masson, Paul, 1999. "Contagion:: macroeconomic models with multiple equilibria," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 587-602, August.
  32. Holden, Ken & Thompson, John & Ruangrit, Yuphin, 2005. "The Asian crisis and calendar effects on stock returns in Thailand," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 163(1), pages 242-252, May.
  33. Kamel Malik Bensafta & Semedo Gervasio, 2011. "Chocs, chocs de volatilité et contagion entre les marchés boursiers. Application d'un modèle icss-mgarch," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 62(2), pages 277-311.
  34. Hamao, Yasushi & Masulis, Ronald W & Ng, Victor, 1990. "Correlations in Price Changes and Volatility across International Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(2), pages 281-307.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00821. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.