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Job-Related Training Activity by Immigrants to Canada


  • Derek Hum
  • Wayne Simpson


The 1998 Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) identifies immigrants for the first time and is used to compare the training experiences of immigrants and native-born Canadians. Previous Canadian research indicates that immigrants generally acquire less human capital after arrival than the native-born. Further, if foreign human capital has reduced value in the host labour market, training will be limited for older migrants. We find that training is reduced by about one year for each year that migration is delayed for both men and women in both pooled and separate samples of immigrants and the native-born. Immigrants who arrive in Canada as adults train less than those who arrive as children, while immigrants who arrive as children do about as well as the native-born. Financial constraints may explain some of the training disadvantage, but other common explanations, such as language, are rejected.

Suggested Citation

  • Derek Hum & Wayne Simpson, 2003. "Job-Related Training Activity by Immigrants to Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 29(4), pages 469-489, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:29:y:2003:i:4:p:469-489

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Derek Hum & Wayne Simpson, 1999. "Wage Opportunities for Visible Minorities in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(3), pages 379-394, September.
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    13. Duncan, Greg J & Hoffman, Saul, 1979. "On-the-Job Training and Earnings Differences by Race and Sex," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(4), pages 594-603, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Skuterud, Mikal & Su, Mingcui, 2009. "Immigrant Wage Assimilation and the Return to Foreign and Host-Country Sources of Human Capital," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-38, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 26 Jun 2009.
    2. Kuan Xu & Zhengxi Lin, 2007. "Participation in Employer-sponsored Training in Canada: Role of Firm Characteristics and Worker Attributes," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive paperb1_7_ic_workingpaper, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    3. Mikal Skuterud & Mingcui Su, 2012. "The influence of measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity in estimating immigrant returns to foreign and host-country sources of human capital," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 1109-1141, December.
    4. McDonald, James Ted & Worswick, Christopher, 2011. "Incidence and Returns to Apprenticeship Training in Canada: the Role of Family Background and Immigrant Status," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2011-3, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 27 Jan 2011.
    5. Friederike von Haaren-Giebel & Malte Sandner, 2016. "Naturalisation and on-the-job training: evidence from first-generation immigrants in Germany," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-28, December.
    6. Banerjee, Rupa & Verma, Anil, 2009. "Determinants and Effects of Post-Migration Education Among New Immigrants in Canada," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-20, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 11 Mar 2009.

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