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The intertemporal approach to the current account: Evidence for Argentina

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Abstract

The Argentinean current account has exhibited large fluctuations over time. Sizable deficits over the last part of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th were followed by an almost equilibrated balance for most of the 20th century. Moderate deficits were again recorded between 1990 and 2002. Can factors highlighted by the intertemporal approach to the current account explain the dynamics of the Argentinean external sector for the 1885-2002 period? To answer this question we make use of a model featuring two main external shocks for small economies: real interest rates and exchange rates. In contrast to its application to other Latin American countries, the intertemporal model does not track well the actual current account from 1885 to 2002 in Argentina. This is due to the country’s lack of access to the international financial system (a main assumption in the model), the occurrence of balance of payments crises, and the stop and go process. There is, however, some evidence in favor of the theor y for the period 1885-1930, when capital mobility was relatively high and free of currency crises and stop and go cycles.

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  • Diego N. Moccero, 2008. "The intertemporal approach to the current account: Evidence for Argentina," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 11, pages 327-353, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cem:jaecon:v:11:y:2008:n:2:p:327-353
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    1. Sheffrin, Steven M. & Woo, Wing Thye, 1990. "Testing an optimizing model of the current account via the consumption function," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 220-233, June.
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    5. Trehan, Bharat & Walsh, Carl E, 1991. "Testing Intertemporal Budget Constraints: Theory and Applications to U.S. Federal Budget and Current Account Deficits," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(2), pages 206-223, May.
    6. Finn E. Kydland & Carlos E.J.M. Zarazaga, 2003. "Argentina's lost decade and subsequent recovery: hits and misses of the neoclassical growth model," Center for Latin America Working Papers 0403, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    7. Huang, Chao-Hsi & Lin, Kenneth S., 1993. "Deficits, government expenditures, and tax smoothing in the United States: 1929-1988," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 317-339, June.
    8. Greenwood, Jeremy, 1983. "Expectations, the exchange rate, and the current account," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 543-569, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michał Brzozowski & Sadananda Prusty, 2013. "Impact of GDP volatility on current account balances," International Journal of Economics and Business Research, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(3), pages 239-252.

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