IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bpj/bjafio/v8y2010i1n2.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Prices as Quality Signals: Evidence from the Wine Market

Author

Listed:
  • Schnabel Hubert

    (Vereinigte Hospitien Trier)

  • Storchmann Karl

    (New York University)

Abstract

In this paper we empirically analyze whether prices serve as signals. Specifically, and following the hypothesis by Bagwell and Riordan (1991), we examine whether (1) higher quality and (2) low consumer information levels about quality are associated with prices that are above the full information equilibrium. We refer to two price samples of identical wines and analyze the difference between both. The first sample consists of prices for informed wholesalers who can taste the wines before purchase. The second sample comprises retail prices for the imperfectly informed public. We find support for the Bagwell-Riordan model, i.e., price signals respond positively to wine quality and negatively to increasing information. For our sample, the information effect by far dominates the quality effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Schnabel Hubert & Storchmann Karl, 2010. "Prices as Quality Signals: Evidence from the Wine Market," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-23, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bjafio:v:8:y:2010:i:1:n:2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jafio.2010.8.1/jafio.2010.8.1.1283/jafio.2010.8.1.1283.xml?format=INT
    Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jean Tirole, 1988. "The Theory of Industrial Organization," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262200716.
    2. Janssen, Maarten C.W. & Roy, Santanu, 2010. "Signaling quality through prices in an oligopoly," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 192-207, January.
    3. Mahenc, Philippe & Meunier, Valérie, 2006. "Early Sales of Bordeaux grands crus," Journal of Wine Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(01), pages 57-74, March.
    4. Marco Costanigro & Jill J. McCluskey & Christopher Goemans, 2010. "The Economics of Nested Names: Name Specificity, Reputations, and Price Premia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1339-1350.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Orley Ashenfelter & Karl Storchmann, 2010. "Measuring the Economic Effect of Global Warming on Viticulture Using Auction, Retail, and Wholesale Prices," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 37(1), pages 51-64, August.
    2. Jianyu Yu & Zohra Bouamra-Mechemache & Angelo Zago, 2018. "What is in a Name? Information, Heterogeneity, and Quality in a Theory of Nested Names," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 100(1), pages 286-310.
    3. Brunke, Henrich & Lapsley, James T. & Mueller, Rolf A.E. & Tauscher, Ludwig, 2016. ""Tested Quality In The Glass": Wine Quality Certification In Germany," Working Papers 234641, American Association of Wine Economists.
    4. Edward Oczkowski, 2016. "Analysing Firm-level Price Effects for Differentiated Products: The Case of Australian Wine Producers," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 43-62, March.
    5. Antonis Michis & Anna Markidou, 2013. "Determinants of retail wine prices: evidence from Cyprus," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 267-280, August.
    6. Kapferer, Jean-Noël & Laurent, Gilles, 2016. "Where do consumers think luxury begins? A study of perceived minimum price for 21 luxury goods in 7 countries," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 332-340.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:bjafio:v:8:y:2010:i:1:n:2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.degruyter.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.