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Trade, Strategic Environmental Policy, and Global Pollution

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  • Akihiko Yanase

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of international trade in a model with global pollution that accumulates over time because of production emissions in each country. If countries cooperatively determine their environmental policies, autarky and free trade in the absence of trade costs generate the same optimal solution. By contrast, if environmental policies are determined noncooperatively, the effects of trade on global pollution and welfare are ambiguous because policy games can result in multiple equilibria. Although trade increases both the lower and upper bounds of the pollution stock, whether trade expands the range of possible steady-state pollution levels is ambiguous. The analysis then extends to consider trade costs. Copyright © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Akihiko Yanase, 2010. "Trade, Strategic Environmental Policy, and Global Pollution," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 493-512, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:18:y:2010:i:3:p:493-512
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Akihiko Yanase, 2005. "Pollution Control in Open Economies: Implications of Within-period Interactions for Dynamic Game Equilibrium," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 84(3), pages 277-311, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Naoto Jinji, 2013. "Is Corporate Environmentalism Good for Domestic Welfare?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(5), pages 901-911, November.
    2. Charles F. Mason, 2017. "Transboundary Externalities and Reciprocal Taxes: A Differential Game Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 6561, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Calvo, Emilio & Rubio, Santiago J., 2013. "Dynamic Models of International Environmental Agreements: A Differential Game Approach," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 6(4), pages 289-339, April.
    4. Stephen Devadoss & Jude Bayham, 2013. "US Ethanol Trade Policy: Pollution Reduction or Domestic Protection," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(3), pages 568-584, August.

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