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Taste Parameters as Model Residuals: Assessing the “Fit” of an Armington Trade Model

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  • Russell H. Hillberry
  • Michael A. Anderson
  • Edward J. Balistreri
  • Alan K. Fox

Abstract

We note that calibration parameters in a multi‐country Armington trade model play a role similar to that of econometric residuals: they allow the model to fit the data exactly. We use this premise to evaluate the “fit” of a standard multi‐country computable general‐equilibrium model. We find that the model relies heavily on these parameters to explain the pattern of trade. In 33 of the 46 commodity groups we assess, modeled economic behavior explains less than 20% of the variation in bilateral trade. In a calibration‐ as‐estimation experiment, we estimate the commodity‐specific elasticities of substitution consistent with a well‐fitting model and find that they are substantially higher than widely accepted estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Russell H. Hillberry & Michael A. Anderson & Edward J. Balistreri & Alan K. Fox, 2005. "Taste Parameters as Model Residuals: Assessing the “Fit” of an Armington Trade Model," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(5), pages 973-984, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:13:y:2005:i:5:p:973-984
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9396.2005.00548.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9396.2005.00548.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
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    Cited by:

    1. Balistreri, Edward J. & Hillberry, Russell H. & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2011. "Structural estimation and solution of international trade models with heterogeneous firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 95-108, March.
    2. James E. Anderson & Mario Larch & Yoto V. Yotov, 2018. "GEPPML: General equilibrium analysis with PPML," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(10), pages 2750-2782, October.
    3. Yilmazkuday, Hakan, 2012. "Understanding interstate trade patterns," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 158-166.
    4. Cho, Sang-Wook (Stanley) & Díaz, Julián P., 2013. "Trade integration and the skill premium: Evidence from a transition economy," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 601-620.
    5. Mario Larch & Yoto V. Yotov, 2016. "General Equilibrium Trade Policy Analysis with Structural Gravity," CESifo Working Paper Series 6020, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Welsch, Heinz, 2008. "Armington elasticities for energy policy modeling: Evidence from four European countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2252-2264, September.
    7. Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2017. "A Solution to the Missing Globalization Puzzle by Non-CES Preferences," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(3), pages 649-676, August.
    8. Yao, Guolin & Hillberry, Russell, 2018. "Structural Gravity Model Estimates of Nested CES Import Demands for Soybeans," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274281, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Lionel Fontagné & Houssein Guimbard & Gianluca Orefice, 2019. "Product-level Trade Elasticities," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-02444897, HAL.
    10. Whalley, John & Xin, Xian, 2009. "Home and regional biases and border effects in Armington type models," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 309-319, March.
    11. Kim J. Ruhl, 2008. "The International Elasticity Puzzle," Working Papers 08-30, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    12. Hillberry, Russell & Hummels, David, 2013. "Trade Elasticity Parameters for a Computable General Equilibrium Model," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, in: Peter B. Dixon & Dale Jorgenson (ed.), Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 1213-1269, Elsevier.
    13. Debaere, Peter & Mostashari, Shalah, 2010. "Do tariffs matter for the extensive margin of international trade? An empirical analysis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 163-169, July.
    14. Balistreri, Edward J. & Markusen, James R., 2009. "Sub-national differentiation and the role of the firm in optimal international pricing," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 47-62, January.
    15. Yulin Hou & Yun Wang & Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2017. "Gravity Channels in Trade," Globalization Institute Working Papers 297, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 01 Jan 2017.

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