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Enterprise Zones and Individual Welfare: A Case Study of California


  • Raphael W. Bostic
  • Allen C. Prohofsky


This research examines the benefits to individual workers hired under California's enterprise zone (EZ) program. The analysis reveals that EZ program participation has a positive impact on both wages and adjusted gross income of EZ participants, and the benefits appear to be greater for taxpayers with very low initial income. It is unclear whether the income boost from EZ participation is permanent or transitory. We also find that participation in the EZ program increases the likelihood that an individual will file a tax return. Because this is a case study, we caution that additional analysis is needed to fully determine the extent to which these results can be generalized. Copyright Blackwell Publishers, 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Raphael W. Bostic & Allen C. Prohofsky, 2006. "Enterprise Zones and Individual Welfare: A Case Study of California," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 175-203.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:46:y:2006:i:2:p:175-203

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Peter S. Fisher, 1997. "Tax and spending incentives and enterprise zones," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 109-138.
    2. Ashenfelter, Orley C, 1978. "Estimating the Effect of Training Programs on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 47-57, February.
    3. Alan H. Peters & Peter S. Fisher, 2002. "State Enterprise Zone Programs: Have They Worked?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number sezp, November.
    4. Papke, Leslie E., 1994. "Tax policy and urban development : Evidence from the Indiana enterprise zone program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 37-49, May.
    5. Edward C. Lorenz, 1995. "TJTC and the promise and reality of redistributive vouchering and tax credit policy," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(2), pages 270-290.
    6. Kevin Hollenbeck & Richard J. Willke, 1991. "The Employment and Earnings Impacts of the Targeted Jobs Tax Credit," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 91-07, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    7. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle, November.
    8. Robert Avery & Patricia Beeson & Paul Calem, 1997. "Using HMDA Data as a Regulatory Screen for Fair Lending Compliance," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 11(1), pages 9-42, February.
    9. James J. Heckman & Jeffrey A. Smith, 1999. "The Pre-Program Earnings Dip and the Determinants of Participation in a Social Program: Implications for Simple Program Evaluation Strategies," NBER Working Papers 6983, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Barry M. Rubin & Craig M. Richards, 1992. "A Transatlantic Comparison of Enterprise Zone Impacts: The British and American Experience," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 6(4), pages 431-443, November.
    11. Heckman, James J. & Lalonde, Robert J. & Smith, Jeffrey A., 1999. "The economics and econometrics of active labor market programs," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 31, pages 1865-2097 Elsevier.
    12. Gary Burtless, 1985. "Are Targeted Wage Subsidies Harmful? Evidence from a Wage Voucher Experiment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(1), pages 105-114, October.
    13. Heckman, James J & Smith, Jeffrey A, 1999. "The Pre-programme Earnings Dip and the Determinants of Participation in a Social Programme. Implications for Simple Programme Evaluation Strategies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 313-348, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gobillon, Laurent & Magnac, Thierry & Selod, Harris, 2012. "Do unemployed workers benefit from enterprise zones? The French experience," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(9-10), pages 881-892.
    2. Neumark, David & Kolko, Jed, 2010. "Do enterprise zones create jobs? Evidence from California's enterprise zone program," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 1-19, July.

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