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Disentangling Treatment Effects of Polish Active Labour Market Policies: Evidence from Matched Samples

  • Jochen Kluve
  • Hartmut Lehmann
  • Christoph M. Schmidt

This paper estimates causal effects of two Polish active labor market policies - training and intervention works - on employment probabilities. Using data from the 18th wave of the Polish Labor Force Survey we discuss three stages of an exact-matching-within-calipers procedure and show how the method succeeds in balancing relevant covariates. The approach is supported by estimating propensity scores for a post-match sample. We implement a conditional difference-in-differences estimator of treatment effects based on individual trinomial sequences of pre-treatment labor market status. Our findings suggest that training raises employment probability, while intervention works displays a negative treatment effect. Furthermore we find that appropriate subdivision of the matched sample for conditional treatment effect estimation can add considerable insight to the interpretation of results.

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File URL: http://www.sml.hw.ac.uk/downloads/cert/wpa/2000/dp0007.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University in its series CERT Discussion Papers with number 0007.

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Date of creation: 2000
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Handle: RePEc:hwe:certdp:0007
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  1. Dehejia, R.H. & Wahba, S., 1998. "Propensity Score Matching Methods for Non-Experimental Causal Studies," Discussion Papers 1998_02, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  2. Michael Lechner, 2000. "An Evaluation of Public-Sector-Sponsored Continuous Vocational Training Programs in East Germany," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(2), pages 347-375.
  3. Marek Gora and Christoph M. Schmidt & Marek Gora and Christoph M. Schmidt, 1997. "Long-Term Unemployment, Unemployment Benefits and Social Assistance: The Polish Experience," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 110, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  4. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
  5. Heckman, James J & Smith, Jeffrey A, 1999. "The Pre-programme Earnings Dip and the Determinants of Participation in a Social Programme. Implications for Simple Programme Evaluation Strategies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 313-48, July.
  6. Orley Ashenfelter & David Card, 1984. "Using the Longitudinal Structure of Earnings to Estimate the Effect of Training Programs," Working Papers 554, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  7. Jochen Kluve & Hartmut Lehmann & Christophe M. Schmidt, 1999. "Active Labor Market Policies in Poland: Human Capital Enhancement, Stigmatization or Benefit Churning?," LICOS Discussion Papers 8099, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  8. Augurzky, Boris & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2001. "The Propensity Score: A Means to An End," IZA Discussion Papers 271, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. LaLonde, Robert J, 1986. "Evaluating the Econometric Evaluations of Training Programs with Experimental Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 604-20, September.
  10. Puhani, Patrick A, 1998. "Advantage Through Training? A Microeconometric Evaluation of the Employment Effects of Active Labour Market Programmes in Poland," CEPR Discussion Papers 2000, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  11. Card, David & Sullivan, Daniel G, 1988. "Measuring the Effect of Subsidized Training Programs on Movements in and out of Employment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(3), pages 497-530, May.
  12. Joshua D. Angrist & Jinyong Hahn, 1999. "When to Control for Covariates? Panel-Asymptotic Results for Estimates of Treatment Effects," NBER Technical Working Papers 0241, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Heckman, James J. & Lalonde, Robert J. & Smith, Jeffrey A., 1999. "The economics and econometrics of active labor market programs," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 31, pages 1865-2097 Elsevier.
  14. Schmidt, Christoph M, 2001. "Knowing What Works. The Case for Rigorous Programme Evaluation," CEPR Discussion Papers 2826, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. James J. Heckman & Jeffrey A. Smith, 1999. "The Pre-Program Earnings Dip and the Determinants of Participation in a Social Program: Implications for Simple Program Evaluation Strategies," NBER Working Papers 6983, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Ashenfelter, Orley C, 1978. "Estimating the Effect of Training Programs on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 47-57, February.
  17. Jinyong Hahn, 1998. "On the Role of the Propensity Score in Efficient Semiparametric Estimation of Average Treatment Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(2), pages 315-332, March.
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