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Do Training Programmes Get The Unemployed Back To Work? A Look At The Spanish Experience



    (Universidad de Alicante)


El artículo analiza el efecto del programa de formación público del Instituto Nacional de Empleo (INEM) para trabajadores desempleados sobre las perspectivas de empleo. Dos grupos de desempleados españoles son comparados entre abril de 2000 y febrero de 2001, uno de ellos participó en los cursos de formación en el primer trimestre de 2000. Se utiliza metodología de emparejamiento con probabilidad de participación para evaluar el efecto causal de los cursos de formación en la duración del desempleo. Las estimaciones sugieren que los cursos de nivel medio redujeron más la duración del desempleo que los de otros niveles. Las mujeres formadas reducen más el periodo de desempleo que los hombres formados, aunque las diferencias no son suficientemente grandes para reducir las desigualdades de género en el mercado de trabajo de forma significativa.

Suggested Citation

  • F. Alfonso Arellano, 2010. "Do Training Programmes Get The Unemployed Back To Work? A Look At The Spanish Experience," Revista de Economia Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Estructura Economica y Economia Publica, vol. 18(2), pages 39-65, Autumn.
  • Handle: RePEc:rev:reveca:v:18:y:2010:i:2:p:39-65

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    políticas activas de empleo; cursos de formación; duración del desempleo; emparejamiento con probabilidad de participación;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy


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