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Evaluation of Swedish Youth Labor Market Programs

  • Laura Larsson
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    A nonparametric matching approach is applied to estimate the average effects of two active labor market programs for youth in Sweden: youth practice and labor market training. The results of the evaluation indicate either zero or negative effects of both programs on earnings, employment probability, and the probability of entering education in the short run, whereas the long-run effects are mainly zero or slightly positive. The results also suggest that youth practice was more effective—or ‘‘less harmful’’— than labor market training. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in the estimated treatment effects among individuals.

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    File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/XXXVIII/4/891
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    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 38 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:38:y:2003:i:4:p891-927
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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    1. Heckman, J.J. & Hotz, V.J., 1988. "Choosing Among Alternative Nonexperimental Methods For Estimating The Impact Of Social Programs: The Case Of Manpower Training," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 88-12, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
    2. Lechner, Michael, 1999. "Earnings and Employment Effects of Continuous Off-the-Job Training in East Germany after Unification," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(1), pages 74-90, January.
    3. John P Martin, 1998. "What Works Among Active Labour Market Policies: Evidence from OECD Countries' Experiences," RBA Annual Conference Volume, in: Guy Debelle & Jeff Borland (ed.), Unemployment and the Australian Labour Market Reserve Bank of Australia.
    4. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-12, March.
    5. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173, March.
    6. V. Joseph Hotz & Guido W. Imbens & Julie H. Mortimer, 1999. "Predicting the Efficacy of Future Training Programs Using Past Experiences," NBER Technical Working Papers 0238, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ackum, Susanne, 1991. " Youth Unemployment, Labor Market Programs and Subsequent Earnings," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(4), pages 531-43.
    8. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra, 1998. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 261-94, April.
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