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How Do Administrative Arrangements Affect Exit from Unemployment Payments? The Case of the Job Seeker Diary in Australia

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  • Jeff Borland

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Melbourne)

  • Yi-Ping Tseng

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This study examines the impact of the Jobseeker Diary program (JSD), a large-scale intervention designed to increase job search effort of unemployed persons in Australia. Its scale, and focus on work-search verification, make the JSD program relatively unique in the international context. Participation in the JSD is found to significantly increase the likelihood of an unemployment payment recipient exiting payments, and to reduce total time spent on payments. At least one-half of JSD participants are estimated to have reduced time on payments. Largest effects of the JSD occur for payment recipients for whom labour demand conditions are the most 'favourable'. The findings on the impact of the JSD are robust to a wide range of sensitivity checks.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeff Borland & Yi-Ping Tseng, 2003. "How Do Administrative Arrangements Affect Exit from Unemployment Payments? The Case of the Job Seeker Diary in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n27, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2003n27
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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2003n27.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Lixin Cai & Guyonne Kalb & Yi-Ping Tseng & Ha Vu, 2008. "The Effect of Financial Incentives on Labour Supply: Evidence for Lone Parents from Microsimulation and Quasi-Experimental Evaluation," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, pages 285-325.
    2. Headey, Bruce & Muffels, Ruud & Wooden, Mark, 2004. "Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness… Or Does It? A Reconsideration Based on the Combined Effects of Wealth, Income and Consumption," IZA Discussion Papers 1218, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Lixin Cai & Guyonne Kalb, 2007. "Health status and labour force status of older working-age Australian men," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, pages 227-252.
    4. Lixin Cai & Guyonne Kalb & Yi-Ping Tseng & Hong Ha Vu, 2005. "The Effect of Financial Incentives on Labour Supply: Evidence for Sole Parents from Microsimulation and Quasi-Experimental Evaluation," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2005n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Gray, Matthew & Hunter, Boyd, 2005. "Indigenous Job Search Success," MPRA Paper 1393, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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