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Tax and spending incentives and enterprise zones

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  • Peter S. Fisher

Abstract

Firm-specific incentives and enterprise zones are the two most rapidly growing weapons in states' and localities' competitive arsenal. What incentives have states and localities adopted, which of these incentives are spreading, and what are the prominent successes and failures? What has been the experience with "clawback" provisions, assurances from recipients that they will actually create the jobs and other economic benefits they promise?

Suggested Citation

  • Peter S. Fisher, 1997. "Tax and spending incentives and enterprise zones," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Mar, pages 109-138.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:1997:i:mar:p:109-138
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lynn W. Bachelor, 1991. "Michigan, Mazda, and the Factory of the Future: Evaluating Economic Development Incentives," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 5(2), pages 114-125, May.
    2. Newman, Robert J. & Sullivan, Dennis H., 1988. "Econometric analysis of business tax impacts on industrial location: What do we know, and how do we know it?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 215-234, March.
    3. Timothy J. Bartik, 2003. "Local Economic Development Policies," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 03-91, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    4. Peter S. Fisher & Alan H. Peters, 1996. "Taxes, incentives and competition for investment," The Region, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Jun, pages 52-57.
    5. Robert Tannenwald, 1996. "State business tax climate: how should it be measured and how important is it?," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 23-38.
    6. Matthew R. Marlin, 1990. "The Effectiveness of Economic Development Subsidies," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 4(1), pages 15-22, February.
    7. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle, November.
    8. Barry M. Rubin & Craig M. Richards, 1992. "A Transatlantic Comparison of Enterprise Zone Impacts: The British and American Experience," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 6(4), pages 431-443, November.
    9. Michael J. Stutzer, 1985. "The statewide economic impact of small-issue industrial revenue bonds," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr.
    10. Dan Y. Dabney, 1991. "Do Enterprise Zone Incentives Affect Business Location Decisions?," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 5(4), pages 325-334, November.
    11. Ernest P. Goss, 1994. "The Impact Of Infrastructure Spending On New Business Formation: The Importance Of State Economic Development Spending," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 24(3), pages 265-279, Winter.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chang Nam & Doina Radulescu, 2004. "Do Corporate Tax Concessions Really Matter for the Success of Free Economic Zones?," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 99-123, June.
    2. Raphael W. Bostic & Allen C. Prohofsky, 2006. "Enterprise Zones and Individual Welfare: A Case Study of California," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 175-203.
    3. Gobillon, Laurent & Magnac, Thierry & Selod, Harris, 2012. "Do unemployed workers benefit from enterprise zones? The French experience," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(9-10), pages 881-892.
    4. Gary Dymski, 2009. "Financing Community Development in the US: A Comparison of “War on Poverty” and 1990s-Era Policy Approaches," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 245-273, December.
    5. Nizalov, Denys & Loveridge, Scott, 2005. "The Differential Impact of Regional Policies on Economic Growth: One Size Does Not Fit All," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19360, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. William Hoyt & Christopher Jepsen & Kenneth Troske, 2009. "Business Incentives and Employment: What Incentives Work and Where?," Working Papers 2009-02, University of Kentucky, Institute for Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations.
    7. repec:eee:regeco:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:249-259 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Lee, Yoonsoo, 2008. "Geographic redistribution of US manufacturing and the role of state development policy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 436-450, September.
    9. Felix, R. Alison & Hines, James R., 2013. "Who offers tax-based business development incentives?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 80-91.
    10. Figlio, David N. & Blonigen, Bruce A., 2000. "The Effects of Foreign Direct Investment on Local Communities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 338-363, September.
    11. Christine Ryan & John Wilson & William Fulton, 2003. "The Impact of Urban Growth Boundaries on Future Urbanization," Working Paper 8610, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    12. Daniele Bondonio & Robert T. Greenbaum, 2003. "A comparative evaluation of spacially targeted economic revitalization programs in the European Union and the United States," ICER Working Papers 03-2003, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    13. Adrien Lorenceau, 2009. "L'impact d'exonérations fiscales sur la création d'établissements et l'emploi en France rurale : une approche par discontinuité de la régression," Working Papers halshs-00575100, HAL.

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