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Workers' Views of the Impact of Trade on Jobs


  • Clair Brown
  • Julia Lane
  • Timothy Sturgeon


Although public policy is influenced by the perception that workers worry about the impact of trade on their jobs, there is little empirical evidence on what shapes such views. This paper uses new data to examine how workers’ perceptions of the impact of trade are related to their career paths, job characteristics, and local labor market conditions. Surprisingly, given prior literature, we find that workers’ perceptions primarily reflect local labor market conditions and education rather than labor market experiences or job characteristics.
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Suggested Citation

  • Clair Brown & Julia Lane & Timothy Sturgeon, 2013. "Workers' Views of the Impact of Trade on Jobs," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 1-21, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indres:v:52:y:2013:i:1:p:1-21
    DOI: 10.1111/irel.12009

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies


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