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Workers' Views of the Impact of Trade on Jobs

  • Brown, Clair

    ()

    (University of California, Berkeley)

  • Lane, Julia

    ()

    (American Institutes for Research)

  • Sturgeon, Timothy

    ()

    (MIT)

Although public policy is influenced by the perception that workers worry about the impact of trade on their jobs, there is little empirical evidence on what shapes such views. This paper uses new data to examine how workers’ perceptions of the impact of trade are related to their career paths, job characteristics, and local labor market conditions. Surprisingly, given prior literature, we find that workers’ perceptions primarily reflect local labor market conditions and education rather than labor market experiences or job characteristics.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5368.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5368
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  1. John J. Abowd & John Haltiwanger & Julia Lane, 2004. "Integrated Longitudinal Employer-Employee Data for the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 224-229, May.
  2. Avraham Ebenstein & Ann Harrison & Margaret McMillan & Shannon Phillips, 2014. "Estimating the Impact of Trade and Offshoring on American Workers using the Current Population Surveys," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(3), pages 581-595, October.
  3. Daniel Aaronson & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1998. "The decline of job security in the 1990s: displacement, anxiety, and their effect on wage growth," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q I, pages 17-43.
  4. O'Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj, 2003. "Heckscher-Ohlin Theory and Individual Attitudes Towards Globalization," CEPR Discussion Papers 4018, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. John M. Abowd & Patrick Corbel & Francis Kramarz, 1996. "The Entry and Exit of Workers and the Growth of Employment: An Analysis of French Establishments," NBER Working Papers 5551, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Melvin Stephens, Jr., 2003. "Job Loss Expectations, Realizations, and Household Consumption Behavior," NBER Working Papers 9508, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Harrison, Ann & McMillan, Margaret S. & Null, Clair, 2006. "US multinational activity abroad and US jobs: substitutes or complements?," MPRA Paper 36277, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Brown, Clair & Haltiwanger, John & Lane, Julia, 2006. "Economic Turbulence," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 0, number 9780226076324, March.
  9. Richard G. Anderson & Charles S. Gascon, 2007. "The perils of globalization: offshoring and economic insecurity of the American worker," Working Papers 2007-004, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
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