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The Employment Effect of Industry-Specific, Collectively Bargained Minimum Wages

  • Hanna Frings

This paper estimates the employment effects of industry-specific, collectively-bargained minimum wages in Germany for two occupations associated with the construction sector. I propose a truly exogenous control group in contrast to the control group design used in the literature. Further, a difference-in-differences-in-differences estimator is presented as a robustness test for occupation-specific and/or industry-specific, timevarying, unobserved heterogeneity. I do not find a significantly negative employment effect, even though the minimum wage is binding in (East) Germany. This result can be explained by substitution effects, noncompliance and models of monopsonic competition.

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Article provided by Verein für Socialpolitik in its journal German Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 14 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (08)
Pages: 258-281

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Handle: RePEc:bla:germec:v:14:y:2013:i:3:p:258-281
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  1. Sara Lemos, 2003. "Political Variables as Instruments for the Minimum Wage," Anais do XXXI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 31th Brazilian Economics Meeting] f08, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  2. Hirsch, Barry & Kaufman, Bruce E. & Zelenska, Tetyana, 2011. "Minimum Wage Channels of Adjustment," IZA Discussion Papers 6132, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 772-93, September.
  4. Bruce D. Meyer, 1994. "Natural and Quasi- Experiments in Economics," NBER Technical Working Papers 0170, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Stephen J. Trejo, 1997. "The Demand for Hours of Labor: Direct Evidence from California," NBER Working Papers 5973, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. David Naumark & William Wascher, 2003. "Minimum wages, labor market institutions, and youth employment: a cross-national analysis," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2003-23, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  7. Pinoli, Sara, 2010. "Rational Expectations and the Puzzling No-Effect of the Minimum Wage," Working Paper Series 2010:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  8. Addison, John T. & Blackburn, McKinley L. & Cotti, Chad D., 2009. "Do minimum wages raise employment? Evidence from the U.S. retail-trade sector," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 397-408, August.
  9. Pia Rattenhuber, 2011. "Building the Minimum Wage: Germany's First Sectoral Minimum Wage and Its Impact on Wages in the Construction Industry," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1111, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  10. Schmucker, Alexandra & Seth, Stefan, 2009. "BA-Beschäftigtenpanel 1998-2007 Codebuch," FDZ Datenreport. Documentation on Labour Market Data 200901_de, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  11. Pinoli, Sara, 2010. "Rational Expectations and the Puzzling No-E¤ect of the Minimum Wage," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2010:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
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