IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/ecorec/v93y2017i300p1-19.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Surfing through the GFC: Systemic Risk in Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Mardi Dungey
  • Marius Matei
  • Matteo Luciani
  • David Veredas

Abstract

We provide empirical evidence on the degree of systemic risk in Australia before, during and after the Global Financial Crisis. We calculate a daily index of systemic risk from 2004 to 2013 in order to understand how real economy firms influence the outcomes for the rest of the economy. This is done via a mapping of the interconnectedness of the financial and non-financial sectors. The financial sector is in general the home to the most consistently systemically risky firms in the economy. The mining sector becomes occasionally as systemically risky as the financial sector, reflecting the importance of understanding the interrelationships between the financial sector and the real economy in monitoring systemic risks.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Mardi Dungey & Marius Matei & Matteo Luciani & David Veredas, 2017. "Surfing through the GFC: Systemic Risk in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(300), pages 1-19, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i:300:p:1-19
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1475-4932.12309
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jianqing Fan & Yuan Liao & Martina Mincheva, 2013. "Large covariance estimation by thresholding principal orthogonal complements," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 75(4), pages 603-680, September.
    2. Diebold, Francis X. & Yılmaz, Kamil, 2014. "On the network topology of variance decompositions: Measuring the connectedness of financial firms," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 182(1), pages 119-134.
    3. Gai, Prasanna & Kapadia, Sujit, 2010. "Contagion in financial networks," Bank of England working papers 383, Bank of England.
    4. repec:fip:fedhpr:y:2010:i:may:p:65-71 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Daron Acemoglu & Asuman Ozdaglar & Alireza Tahbaz-Salehi, 2015. "Systemic Risk and Stability in Financial Networks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(2), pages 564-608, February.
    6. Viral V. Acharya & Lasse H. Pedersen & Thomas Philippon & Matthew Richardson, 2017. "Measuring Systemic Risk," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 2-47.
    7. Francis X. Diebold & Kamil Yilmaz, 2016. "Trans-Atlantic Equity Volatility Connectedness: U.S. and European Financial Institutions, 2004–2014," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 14(1), pages 81-127.
    8. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold, 2007. "Roughing It Up: Including Jump Components in the Measurement, Modeling, and Forecasting of Return Volatility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(4), pages 701-720, November.
    9. Andrew J. Patton & Michela Verardo, 2012. "Does Beta Move with News? Firm-Specific Information Flows and Learning about Profitability," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 25(9), pages 2789-2839.
    10. Billio, Monica & Getmansky, Mila & Lo, Andrew W. & Pelizzon, Loriana, 2012. "Econometric measures of connectedness and systemic risk in the finance and insurance sectors," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 535-559.
    11. Franklin Allen & Douglas Gale, 2000. "Financial Contagion," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(1), pages 1-33, February.
    12. Ellis Connolly & David Orsmond, 2011. "The Mining Industry: From Bust to Boom," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2011-08, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    13. Mardi Dungey & Renee Fry-McKibbin & Verity Linehan, 2014. "Chinese resource demand and the natural resource supplier," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 167-178, January.
    14. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2011. "From Financial Crash to Debt Crisis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1676-1706, August.
    15. Ellis Connolly & David Orsmond, 2011. "The Mining Industry: From Bust to Boom," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: Hugo Gerard & Jonathan Kearns (ed.),The Australian Economy in the 2000s, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    16. Matteo Luciani & David Veredas, 2015. "Estimating and Forecasting Large Panels of Volatilities with Approximate Dynamic Factor Models," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 34(3), pages 163-176, April.
    17. Liudas Giraitis & George Kapetanios & Anne Wetherilt & Filip ŽIKEŠ, 2016. "Estimating the Dynamics and Persistence of Financial Networks, with an Application to the Sterling Money Market," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(1), pages 58-84, January.
    18. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold & Paul Labys, 2003. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(2), pages 579-625, March.
    19. Anufriev, Mikhail & Panchenko, Valentyn, 2015. "Connecting the dots: Econometric methods for uncovering networks with an application to the Australian financial institutions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(S2), pages 241-255.
    20. Dungey Mardi & Matteo Luciani & David Veredas, "undated". "Googling SIFIs," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/154950, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    21. Jayawardena, Nirodha I. & Todorova, Neda & Li, Bin & Su, Jen-Je, 2016. "Forecasting stock volatility using after-hour information: Evidence from the Australian Stock Exchange," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 592-608.
    22. Kallestrup, René & Lando, David & Murgoci, Agatha, 2016. "Financial sector linkages and the dynamics of bank and sovereign credit spreads," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(PA), pages 374-393.
    23. Lützenkirchen, Kristina & Rösch, Daniel & Scheule, Harald, 2013. "Ratings based capital adequacy for securitizations," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5236-5247.
    24. Lam, Clifford & Fan, Jianqing, 2009. "Sparsistency and rates of convergence in large covariance matrix estimation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 31540, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    25. Aït-Sahalia, Yacine & Cacho-Diaz, Julio & Laeven, Roger J.A., 2015. "Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 585-606.
    26. Shaun K. Roache, 2012. "China's Impacton World Commodity Markets," IMF Working Papers 12/115, International Monetary Fund.
    27. Dungey, Mardi & Matei, Marius & Treepongkaruna, Sirimon, 2014. "Identifying periods of financial stress in Asian currencies: the role of high frequency financial market data," Working Papers 2014-12, University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics.
    28. Van Rijckeghem, Caroline & Weder, Beatrice, 2001. "Sources of contagion: is it finance or trade?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 293-308, August.
    29. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & John Moore, 2002. "Balance-Sheet Contagion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 46-50, May.
    30. Dungey, Mardi & Gajurel, Dinesh, 2015. "Contagion and banking crisis – International evidence for 2007–2009," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 271-283.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Baumöhl, Eduard & Bouri, Elie & Hoang, Thi-Hong-Van & Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain & Výrost, Tomáš, 2020. "Increasing systemic risk during the Covid-19 pandemic: A cross-quantilogram analysis of the banking sector," EconStor Preprints 222580, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    2. Christina Bui, 2018. "Bank Regulation and Financial Stability," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 5-2018, September.
    3. Anufriev, Mikhail & Panchenko, Valentyn, 2015. "Connecting the dots: Econometric methods for uncovering networks with an application to the Australian financial institutions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(S2), pages 241-255.
    4. Dungey, Mardi & Luciani, Matteo & Veredas, David, 2018. "Systemic risk in the US: Interconnectedness as a circuit breaker," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 305-315.
    5. Van Cauwenberge, Annelies & Vancauteren, Mark & Braekers, Roel & Vandemaele, Sigrid, 2019. "International trade, foreign direct investments, and firms’ systemic risk : Evidence from the Netherlands," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 361-386.
    6. Rösch, Daniel & Scheule, Harald, 2016. "The role of loan portfolio losses and bank capital for Asian financial system resilience," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 40(PB), pages 289-305.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i:300:p:1-19. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/esausea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.