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The Evolution Of The Scientific Productivity Of Highly Productive Economists

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  • RAQUEL CARRASCO
  • JAVIER RUIZ-CASTILLO

Abstract

This paper studies the evolution of research productivity of a sample of economists working in the best 81 departments in the world in 2007. The main novelty is that, in so far as a productivity distribution can be identified with an income distribution, we measure productivity mobility in a dynamic context using an indicator inspired in an income mobility index suggested by Fields (2010) for a two-period world. Productivity is measured in terms of the number of publications in each of four classes, weighted according to a rather elitist scheme. We study the evolution of average productivity, productivity inequality, the extent of rank reversals, and productivity mobility for seven cohorts, as well as the population as a whole. We offer new evidence confirming previous results about the heterogeneity of the evolution of productivity for top and other researchers. However, the major result is that –contrary to what was expected– for our sample of very highly productive scholars the effect of rank reversals between the two periods on overall productivity mobility offsets the effect of an increase in productivity inequality from the first to the second period in the youngest five out of seven cohorts
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Suggested Citation

  • Raquel Carrasco & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2014. "The Evolution Of The Scientific Productivity Of Highly Productive Economists," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 1-16, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:52:y:2014:i:1:p:1-16
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ecin.12028
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Perianes-Rodríguez, Antonio & Ruiz-Castillo Ucelay, Javier, 2014. "Within and across department variability in individual productivity : the case of economics," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1404, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    2. Albarrán, Pedro & Carrasco, Raquel & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier, 2015. "The effect of spatial mobility and other factors on academic productivity : some evidence from a set of highly productive economists," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1415, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    3. Stelios Katranidis & Theodore Panagiotidis & Costas Zontanos, 2017. "Economists, Research Performance and National Inbreeding: North Versus South," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 46(1), pages 145-163, February.
    4. José Alberto Molina & Alberto Alcolea & Alfredo Ferrer & Alberto Alcolea & David Iñiguez & Alejandro Rivero & Gonzalo Ruiz & Alfonso Tarancón, 2016. "Co-authorship and Academic Productivity in Economics: Interaction Maps from the Complex Networks Approach," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 914, Boston College Department of Economics.
    5. repec:spr:scient:v:102:y:2015:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1449-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Pedro Albarrán & Raquel Carrasco & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2017. "Geographic mobility and research productivity in a selection of top world economics departments," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 111(1), pages 241-265, April.
    7. Ruiz-Castillo Ucelay, Javier & Carrasco Perea, Raquel, 2018. "Governance, Brain Drain, and Brain Gain in Elite Academic Institutions in Economics : the Case of Spain," UC3M Working papers. Economics 26093, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.

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    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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