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Should Cities Go For The Gold? The Long-Term Impacts Of Hosting The Olympics

Author

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  • STEPHEN B. BILLINGS
  • J. SCOTT HOLLADAY

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Stephen B. Billings & J. Scott Holladay, 2012. "Should Cities Go For The Gold? The Long-Term Impacts Of Hosting The Olympics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(3), pages 754-772, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:50:y:2012:i:3:p:754-772
    DOI: j.1465-7295.2011.00373.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1465-7295.2011.00373.x
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The benefits of hosting the Olympics are nonexistent — no cities want to host them
      by ? in Business Insider on 2017-09-16 19:30:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Victor Ginsburgh & Olivier Gergaud, 2013. "Measuring the effect of cultural events with special emphasis on music festivals," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/152437, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Matthias Firgo & Oliver Fritz, 2017. "Does having the right visitor mix do the job? Applying an econometric shift-share model to regional tourism developments," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 58(3), pages 469-490, May.
    3. Rudkin, Simon & Sharma, Abhijit, 2017. "The Impact of Football Attendance on Tourist Expenditures for the United Kingdom," MPRA Paper 81427, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Paul Dolan & Georgios Kavetsos & Christian Krekel & Dimitris Mavridis & Robert Metcalfe & Claudia Senik & Stefan Szymanski & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2016. "The Host with the Most? The Effects of the Olympic Games on Happiness," PSE Working Papers halshs-01349354, HAL.
    5. Robert A. Baade & Victor A. Matheson, 2016. "Going for the Gold: The Economics of the Olympics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 201-218, Spring.
    6. Volker Nitsch & Nicolai Wendland, 2013. "The IOC's Midas Touch: Summer Olympics and City Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 4378, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Paul Dolan & Georgios Kavetsos & Christian Krekel & Dimitris Mavridis & Robert Metcalfe & Claudia Senik & Stefan Szymanski & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2016. "The Host with the Most? The Effects of the Olympic Games on Happiness," Working Papers halshs-01349354, HAL.
    8. Contreras, Jose L. & Corvalan, Alejandro, 2014. "Olympic Games: No legacy for sports," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 268-271.

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