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Is Hispanic Population Dispersion Into Rural Counties Contributing To Local Economic Growth?

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  • DENNIS COATES
  • T. H. GINDLING

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  • Dennis Coates & T. H. Gindling, 2013. "Is Hispanic Population Dispersion Into Rural Counties Contributing To Local Economic Growth?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(4), pages 649-668, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:31:y:2013:i:4:p:649-668
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    7. Giovanni Peri & Chad Sparber, 2016. "Task Specialization, Immigration, and Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 3, pages 81-115 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Albert Saiz, 2003. "Room in the Kitchen for the Melting Pot: Immigration and Rental Prices," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 502-521, August.
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