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Slow Development And Special Interests

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  • Stephen L. Parente
  • Rui Zhao

Abstract

This article argues that a natural implication of an innovation-based theory of growth is that slow development facilitates the formation of special interest groups. We demonstrate this in a growth model where innovations take the form of new goods and new production processes, and where factor suppliers in individual industries can organize to form rent-extracting special interest groups. We then examine the effect these groups have on an economy's subsequent development. We find that these groups can retard an economy's development for extended periods, but not permanently. Their long-run effect is to increase the volatility of the development process. Copyright 2006 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen L. Parente & Rui Zhao, 2006. "Slow Development And Special Interests," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 991-1011, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:47:y:2006:i:3:p:991-1011
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00830027 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Klaus Desmet & Stephen Parente, 2014. "Resistance to Technology Adoption: The Rise and Decline of Guilds," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(3), pages 437-458, July.
    3. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Scarlato, Margherita, 2012. "Inclusive Institutions, Innovation and Economic Growth: Estimates for European Countries," MPRA Paper 43098, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Dmitry Veselov, 2013. "Redistribution and the political support of free entry policy in the Schumpeterian model with heterogenous agents," HSE Working papers WP BRP 28/EC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    5. Jessica Henson Decker & Jamus Jerome Lim, 2008. "What fundamentally drives growth? Revisiting the institutions and economic performance debate," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(5), pages 698-725.
    6. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Scarlato, Margherita, 2016. "Institutions, Innovation and Economic Growth in European Countries," MPRA Paper 72427, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Dmitry A. Veselov, 2015. "Democratization and Barriers to Entry in a Two-Dimensional Voting Model," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 15004, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    8. Elias Dinopoulos & Constantinos Syropoulos, 2007. "Rent Protection as a Barrier to Innovation and Growth," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(2), pages 309-332, August.
    9. Coates, Dennis & Heckelman, Jac C. & Wilson, Bonnie, 2010. "The political economy of investment: Sclerotic effects from interest groups," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 208-221, June.
    10. Dennis Coates & T. H. Gindling, 2013. "Is Hispanic Population Dispersion Into Rural Counties Contributing To Local Economic Growth?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(4), pages 649-668, October.
    11. Apolte, Thomas & Peters, Heiko, 2009. "Governance, Demokratie und wirtschaftliche Entwicklung in den ehemals sozialistischen Staaten," IÖB-Diskussionspapiere 1/09, University of Münster, Institute for Economic Education.

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