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How Can Public Spending Help You Grow? An Empirical Analysis For Developing Countries

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  • Nihal Bayraktar
  • Blanca Moreno-Dodson

Abstract

type="main"> Although many studies indicate that both the level and composition of public spending are significant for economic growth, the results in the empirical literature are mixed. This paper suggests that the country sample selection and expenditure classification are important in explaining these conflicting results. The empirical analysis shows that the link between growth and public spending, especially its core component, is strong only for countries with macroeconomic stability and fast GDP per capita growth dynamics, which are also capable of using public funds for productive purposes.

Suggested Citation

  • Nihal Bayraktar & Blanca Moreno-Dodson, 2015. "How Can Public Spending Help You Grow? An Empirical Analysis For Developing Countries," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 30-64, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:67:y:2015:i:1:p:30-64
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    1. repec:eee:ecmode:v:72:y:2018:i:c:p:151-164 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Duc-Anh Le & Phu Nguyen-Van & Thi Kim Cuong Pham, 2016. "Public expenditure, growth and productivity of Vietnam’s provinces," Working Papers of BETA 2016-17, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    3. Nihal Bayraktar, 2017. "Impacts Of Africa'S Total And Commodity-Based Trade With China And Oecd Countries†," Eurasian Journal of Economics and Finance, Eurasian Publications, vol. 5(1), pages 95-113.

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