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Growth effects of fiscal policies: an application of robust modified M-estimator

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  • C. Colombier

Abstract

In the field of economics only nonhigh-quality data is usually available, which can cause the widely used least square estimators (LSE) to be biased and inefficient. Therefore, the present study introduces the robust modified M-estimator (MME) proposed by Yohai et al. (1991). In the case of growth regressions with fiscal variables it can be shown that LSE is biased and inefficient, whereas MME is not. The robust regressions ascertain a stable positive growth effect of public infrastructure and education. Moreover, this study shows that government size has not been detrimental to growth for OECD countries in the past. No growth effects of taxation have been found so that endogenous growth theory is not corroborated in this regard. Consequently, fiscal policies aiming at promoting growth should focus on infrastructure and education.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Colombier, 2009. "Growth effects of fiscal policies: an application of robust modified M-estimator," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(7), pages 899-912.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:7:p:899-912
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701736099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sefa Awaworyi Churchill & Mehmet Ugur & Siew Ling Yew, 2017. "Does Government Size Affect Per-Capita Income Growth? A Hierarchical Meta-Regression Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(300), pages 142-171, March.
    2. repec:bla:coecpo:v:35:y:2017:i:1:p:165-192 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Gemmell Norman & Au Joey, 2013. "Do Smaller Governments Raise the Level or Growth of Output? A Review of Recent Evidence," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 64(2), pages 85-116, August.
    4. António Afonso & João Jalles, 2016. "Economic performance, government size, and institutional quality," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 83-109, February.
    5. Barabas, György & Kitlinski, Tobias & Schmidt, Christoph M. & Schmidt, Torsten & Siemers, Lars-H. & Brilon, Werner, 2010. "Verkehrsinfrastrukturinvestitionen: Wachstumsaspekte im Rahmen einer gestaltenden Finanzpolitik. Endbericht - Januar 2010. Forschungsprojekt im Auftrag des Bundesministeriums der Finanzen. Projektnumm," RWI Projektberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, number 72601.
    6. Petr Zimčík, 2016. "Velikost veřejného sektoru a ekonomický růst
      [The Scope of Government and Economic Growth]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2016(4), pages 439-450.
    7. Andreas Bergh & Magnus Henrekson, 2011. "Government Size And Growth: A Survey And Interpretation Of The Evidence," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 872-897, December.
    8. Wadho, Waqar & Ayaz, Umair, 2017. "Government Size and Economic Growth in an Endogenous Growth Model with Rent-seeking," GLO Discussion Paper Series 131, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    9. Carsten Colombier, 2015. "Government Size And Growth: A Survey And Interpretation Of The Evidence – A Comment," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(5), pages 887-895, December.
    10. Halkos, George & Paizanos, Epameinondas, 2015. "Fiscal policy and economic performance: A review of the theoretical and empirical literature," MPRA Paper 67737, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Gemmell, Norman & Au, Joey, 2012. "Government Size, Fiscal Policy and the Level and Growth of Output: A Review of Recent Evidence," Working Paper Series 2603, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    12. Helder Ferreira de Mendon ça & Thiago Cacicedo, 2015. "Size of government and economic growth in the largest Latin American country," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(11), pages 904-910, July.
    13. anwar, saba & munir, kashif, 2013. "Size of the Government, Quality of Institutions and Growth in SAARC Countries," MPRA Paper 49524, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Nihal Bayraktar & Blanca Moreno-Dodson, 2015. "How Can Public Spending Help You Grow? An Empirical Analysis For Developing Countries," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 30-64, January.
    15. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Yew, Siew Ling & Ugur, Mehmet, 2015. "Effects of Government Education and Health Expenditures on Economic Growth: A Meta-analysis," EconStor Preprints 110901, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    16. Roshaiza Taha & Nanthakumar Loganathan, 2014. "Long-Run Nexus between Tax Revenue on Economic Performance: Empirical Evidence from Malaysia," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 2(6), pages 238-245, June.
    17. L. Di Matteo & Tom Barbiero, 2017. "Economic Growth and the Public Sector: A Comparison of Canada and Italy, 1870†2013," Working Papers 069, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
    18. Nazila Alinaghi & W. Robert Reed, 2016. "Taxes and Economic Growth in OECD Countries: A Meta-Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 16/37, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    19. Rodríguez-Arana, Alejandro, 2014. "Política fiscal, expectativas y transición dinámica en el modelo simple de crecimiento endógeno," Panorama Económico, Escuela Superior de Economía, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, vol. 0(18), pages 7-32, primer se.
    20. Colombier, Carsten, 2016. "Population aging in healthcare - a minor issue? Evidence from Switzerland," FiFo Discussion Papers - Finanzwissenschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 16-3, University of Cologne, FiFo Institute for Public Economics.
    21. Wadho, Waqar Ahmed & Ayaz, Umair, 2015. "Rent-seeking, Government Size and Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 71213, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Coll Sebastian, 2014. "Is There Too Much Government in Developed Countries? A Time-Series Analysis of 24 OECD-Economies," Journal of Heterodox Economics, De Gruyter Open, vol. 1(1), pages 1-30, June.

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