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Do public investment and FDI crowd in or crowd out private domestic investment in Malaysia?


  • James Ang


Motivated by the concern of a persistent decline in total investment in Malaysia during the post-crisis era, this article examines the long-run relationship between private domestic investment (PDI), public investment and foreign direct investment (FDI) in Malaysia. Using multivariate cointegration techniques, the results indicate a fairly robust cointegrated relationship between these variables during the period 1960 to 2003. Both public investment and FDI are found to be complementary to, rather than competing with, PDI.

Suggested Citation

  • James Ang, 2009. "Do public investment and FDI crowd in or crowd out private domestic investment in Malaysia?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(7), pages 913-919.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:7:p:913-919
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701721448

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Blanca Moreno-Dodson & Nihal Bayraktar, 2011. "How Public Spending Can Help You Grow : An Empirical Analysis for Developing Countries," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10107, The World Bank.
    2. Turkhan Ali Abdul Manap & Gairuzazmi M Ghani, 2012. "Malaysia's Time Varying Capital Mobility," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(2), pages 1361-1368.
    3. Kose,Ayhan & Ohnsorge,Franziska Lieselotte & Ye,Lei Sandy & Islamaj,Ergys, 2017. "Weakness in investment growth : causes, implications and policy responses," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7990, The World Bank.
    4. Kim, Dong-Hyeon & Lin, Shu-Chin & Suen, Yu-Bo, 2013. "Investment, trade openness and foreign direct investment: Social capability matters," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 56-69.
    5. Nihal Bayraktar & Blanca Moreno-Dodson, 2015. "How Can Public Spending Help You Grow? An Empirical Analysis For Developing Countries," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 30-64, January.
    6. World Bank, 2009. "Malaysia Economic Monitor, November 2009," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3132, The World Bank.
    7. Chen, George S. & Yao, Yao & Malizard, Julien, 2017. "Does foreign direct investment crowd in or crowd out private domestic investment in China? The effect of entry mode," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 409-419.
    8. Bayraktar, Nihal & Moreno-Dodson, Blanca, 2010. "How can public spending help you grow? an empirical analysis for developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5367, The World Bank.

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