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The Gender Gap In Private Pensions


  • Elena Bardasi
  • Stephen P. Jenkins


Older women in Britain receive considerably less private pension income than older men, on average. We analyse this differential by examining differences between the sexes both in private pension coverage and in pension income conditional on receipt. Using regression-based decompositions, we show that both gaps are associated mainly with gender differences in returns to personal characteristics rather than with gender differences in personal characteristics per se. In particular, although there are marked differences between elderly men and elderly women in their lifetime employment histories, these differences account for only a small fraction of the overall private pension income gap between the sexes.
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  • Elena Bardasi & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2010. "The Gender Gap In Private Pensions," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 343-363, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:62:y:2010:i:4:p:343-363

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stewart, Mark B, 2003. "The relationship between the financial position of pensioners and their working-life earnings levels," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 194, Royal Economic Society.
    2. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    3. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    4. William E. Even & David A. Macpherson, 1994. "Gender Differences in Pensions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 555-587.
    5. Susan Harkness, 1996. "The gender earnings gap: evidence from the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(2), pages 1-36, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander M. Danzer & Peter Dolton & Chiara Rosazza Bondibene, 2016. "Who Wins? Evaluating the Impact of UK Public Sector Pension Scheme Reforms," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 237(1), pages 38-46, August.
    2. Panos Tsakloglou & Daniela Mantovani & Fotis Papadopoulos & Holly Sutherland, "undated". "Pension Incomes in the European Union: Policy Reform Strategies in Comparative Perspective," EcoMod2006 272100095, EcoMod.
    3. Christina Behrendt & John Woodall, 2015. "Pensions and other social security income transfers," Chapters,in: Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality, chapter 9, pages 242-262 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Roberto Leombruni & Michele Mosca, 2011. "The lifetime gender gap in Italy. Do the pension system countervails labour market outcomes?," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 113, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    5. Leombruni Roberto & Mosca Michele, 2013. "The lifetime gender gap in Italy. Does the pension system countervail labour market outcomes?," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201302, University of Turin.

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