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The Estimated Effect Of Catholic Schooling On Educational Outcomes Using Propensity Score Matching


  • Anh Ngoc Nguyen
  • Jim Taylor
  • Steve Bradley


Attendance at Catholic high schools is estimated to improve math test scores and to increase high school graduation rates and enrolment in 4-year college. Propensity score matching methods are used to obtain these estimated effects, based on data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study. Since selection into Catholic schools is non-random, matching methods help to overcome the problem of choosing instruments for identifying the Catholic school effect on educational outcomes. The difference-in-differences approach is used on test score data in order to control for fixed unobservable influences on outcomes.
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Suggested Citation

  • Anh Ngoc Nguyen & Jim Taylor & Steve Bradley, 2006. "The Estimated Effect Of Catholic Schooling On Educational Outcomes Using Propensity Score Matching," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 285-307, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:58:y:2006:i:4:p:285-307

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daša Farcnik & Polona Domadenik, 2012. "Has the Bologna reform enhanced the employability of graduates? Early evidence from Slovenia," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 51-75, March.
    2. Bessey Donata & Backes-Gellner Uschi, 2015. "Staying Within or Leaving the Apprenticeship System? Revisions of Educational Choices in Apprenticeship Training," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(6), pages 539-552, December.
    3. Chung-Hua Shen & Yuan Chang, 2012. "Corporate Social Responsibility, Financial Performance and Selection Bias: Evidence from Taiwan’s TWSE-listed Banks," Chapters,in: Research Handbook on International Banking and Governance, chapter 25 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Donata Bessey & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2008. "Dropping out and revising educational decisions: Evidence from vocational education," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0040, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

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