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The Economic Impacts of a New Dam in South-East Queensland


  • Glyn Wittwer


"South-East Queensland has combined the most rapid population growth in Australia with rainfall that has persisted below average for many years. The Queensland Government has responded with a number of plans to supplement existing water supplies in the region. This paper uses a multiregional, dynamic CGE model to estimate the regional impacts of construction of Traveston dam. The magnitude of net welfare benefits of the project depends on underlying assumptions concerning future rainfall patterns. All the mainland state governments are proposing water supply augmentation measures. It is probable that a number of these projects are not justifiable on economic grounds." Copyright (c)2009 The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.

Suggested Citation

  • Glyn Wittwer, 2009. "The Economic Impacts of a New Dam in South-East Queensland," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(1), pages 12-23, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:42:y:2009:i:1:p:12-23

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    Cited by:

    1. Chavez, Holcer & Nadolnyak, Denis A. & Saravia, Miguel, 2013. "Socioeconomic and Environmental Impact of Development Interventions: Rice Production at the Gallito Ciego Reservoir in Peru," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 16(1).
    2. Glyn Wittwer & Mark Horridge, 2010. "Bringing Regional Detail to a CGE Model using Census Data," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 229-255.
    3. Alex Y. Lo, 2013. "Household Preference and Financial Commitment to Flood Insurance in South-East Queensland," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 46(2), pages 160-175, June.
    4. James Giesecke & Mark Horridge & Katarzyna Zawalinska, 2011. "A framework for assessing the economic consequences of the support for Less Favoured Areas within Pillar II of Common Agricultural Policy in a multi-regional CGE setting, with an application to Poland," ERSA conference papers ersa10p872, European Regional Science Association.

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