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Structural Change in the Australian Electricity Industry During the 1990s and the Effect on Household Income Distribution

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  • George Verikios
  • Xiao-guang Zhang

Abstract

We develop a framework for estimating the direct and indirect effects on household income of industry changes; it combines a computable general equilibrium model with a microsimulation model in a two-stage simulation procedure. We apply the framework to analysing changes in the Australian electricity industry during 1990s and their effect on household income across households. Almost all income deciles are found to have benefited from the changes but the pattern of effects meant that there was also a small increase in income inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • George Verikios & Xiao-guang Zhang, 2010. "Structural Change in the Australian Electricity Industry During the 1990s and the Effect on Household Income Distribution," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-207, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:g-207
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joanne Loundes, 2001. "The Financial Performance of Australian Government Trading Enterprises Pre- and Post-Reform," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2001n05, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    2. John Quiggin, 1997. "Estimating the Benefits of Hilmer and Related Reforms," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 30(3), pages 256-272.
    3. Arntz, Melanie & Boeters, Stefan & Gürtzgen, Nicole & Schubert, Stefanie, 2008. "Analysing welfare reform in a microsimulation-AGE model: The value of disaggregation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 422-439, May.
    4. G. A. Meagher & Nisha Agrawal, 1986. "Taxation Reform and Income Distribution in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 19(3), pages 33-56.
    5. Meagher, G A & Dixon, Peter B, 1986. "Analyzing Income Distribution in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 62(179), pages 427-441, December.
    6. DeVuyst, Eric A. & Preckel, Paul V., 1997. "Sensitivity analysis revisited: A quadrature-based approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 175-185, April.
    7. Naqvi, Farzana & Peter, Matthew W, 1996. "A Multiregional, Multisectoral Model of the Australian Economy with an Illustrative Application," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(66), pages 94-113, June.
    8. John Whiteman, 1999. "The Potential Benefits of Hilmer and Related Reforms: Electricity Supply," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(1), pages 17-30.
    9. Nicolas Herault, 2007. "Trade Liberalisation, Poverty and Inequality in South Africa: A Computable General Equilibrium-Microsimulation Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(262), pages 317-328, September.
    10. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 1995. "Macro and Sectoral Implications of Tax Increases with Differing Distributional Impacts," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 28(1), pages 111-117.
    11. N. Hérault, 2006. "Building And Linking A Microsimulation Model To A Cge Model For South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 74(1), pages 34-58, March.
    12. Matthew W. Peter & Mark Horridge & G.A.Meagher & Fazana Naqvi & B.R.Parmenter, 1996. "The Theoretical Structure of MONASH-MRF," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers op-85, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    13. George Verikios & Xiao-guang Zhang, 2008. "Distributional Effects of Changes in Australian Infrastructure Industries during the 1990s," Staff Working Papers 0802, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    14. Cororaton, Caesar B. & Cockburn, John, 2007. "Trade reform and poverty--Lessons from the Philippines: A CGE-microsimulation analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 141-163.
    15. Davies, James B., 2004. "Microsimulation, CGE and Macro Modelling for Transition and Developing Economies," WIDER Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    computable general equilibrium; electricity; household income distribution; microeconomic reform; microsimulation;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • C69 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Other
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution

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