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Regional macroeconomic outcomes under alternative arrangements for the financing of public infrastructure

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  • James Giesecke
  • Peter B. Dixon
  • Maureen T. Rimmer

Abstract

Abstract. We use a dynamic multi‐regional CGE model (MMRF) to evaluate the regional macroeconomic consequences of four methods of financing a program of regional government infrastructure provision. The methods are developer charges, debt, payroll tax and residential rates. We demonstrate that the net gains from a program of public infrastructure development are quite sensitive to the chosen financing means. The net gains are greatest under rates and debt financing, and least under developer charges and payroll tax financing. Abstract. Usamos un modelo CGE multirregional dinámico (MMRF) para evaluar las consecuencias macroeconómicas regionales de cuatro métodos de financiación de un programa de financiamiento de infraestructura por parte de un gobierno regional. Los métodos son cargas al contratista (developer charges), deuda, impuestos salariales y contribución urbana. Demostramos que el beneficio neto de un programa de desarrollo de infraestructura pública es bastante sensible a los medios de financiación elegidos. El beneficio neto es mayor mediante la financiación por contribución y deuda, y menor con la financiación por cargas al contratista e impuestos salariales.

Suggested Citation

  • James Giesecke & Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 2008. "Regional macroeconomic outcomes under alternative arrangements for the financing of public infrastructure," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(1), pages 3-31, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:87:y:2008:i:1:p:3-31
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1435-5957.2007.00147.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1435-5957.2007.00147.x
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    Cited by:

    1. James Giesecke & Chris Schilling, 2009. "Short term gain, long term pain? Impact of New Zealand’s fiscal stimulus - A dynamic general equilibrium analysis," Macroeconomics Working Papers 23003, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Ahmed, Vaqar & Abbas, Ahsan & Ahmed, Sofia, 2013. "Public Infrastructure and economic growth in Pakistan: a dynamic CGE-microsimulation analysis," PEP Working Papers 164414, Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP).
    3. Jason Nassios & John Madden & James Giesecke & Janine Dixon & Nhi Tran & Peter Dixon & Maureen Rimmer & Philip Adams & John Freebairn, 2019. "The economic impact and efficiency of state and federal taxes in Australia," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-289, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    4. James A. Giesecke & Nhi H. Tran, 2018. "The National and Regional Consequences of Australia's Goods and Services Tax," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 94(306), pages 255-275, September.
    5. James A. Giesecke & John R. Madden, 2013. "Evidence-based regional economic policy analysis: the role of CGE modelling," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 6(2), pages 285-301.
    6. Hua Zhong & Michael H. Taylor & Kimberly S. Rollins & Dale T. Manning & Christopher G. Goemans, 2019. "Who pays for water scarcity? Evaluating the welfare implications of water infrastructure investments for cities," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 63(3), pages 559-600, December.
    7. Giesecke, James A. & Madden, John R., 2013. "Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modeling," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, in: Peter B. Dixon & Dale Jorgenson (ed.), Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 379-475, Elsevier.

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