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Investing in rural infrastructure

Author

Listed:
  • William F. Fox
  • Sanela Porca

Abstract

Infrastructure is best envisioned as services that come from a set of public works, not as physical facilities. In concept, infrastructure can expand rural economies by raising productivity levels, allowing expansion in the use of other resources, and attracting resources. Empirical research evidences that at the margin, the net effect of the three factors is for infrastructure to have only a modest effect on economic performance. Infrastructure investments will normally have their biggest impact in economically integrated and intermediate rural areas. Nonetheless, a basic complement of infrastructure is essential to support economic activity, but this set should be seen as accommodating rather than causing growth. Local, market-based approaches are normally the best way to develop the infrastructure and to ensure that an area has the basic infrastructure that can be maintained, supported, and used effectively.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • William F. Fox & Sanela Porca, 2000. "Investing in rural infrastructure," Proceedings – Rural and Agricultural Conferences, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Oct, pages 63-89.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkrc:y:2000:i:oct:p:63-89
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael J. Hicks, 2006. "Transportation and infrastructure, retail clustering, and local public finance: evidence from Wal-Mart's expansion," Regional Economic Development, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Oct, pages 100-114.
    2. Edward J. Malecki, 2001. "Going digital in rural America," Proceedings – Rural and Agricultural Conferences, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Sep, pages 49-68.
    3. Leck, Eran & Bekhor, Shlomo & Gat, Daniel, 2008. "Equity Impacts of Transportation Improvements On Core and Peripheral Cities," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 1(2), pages 153-182.
    4. Brian Dabson, 2001. "Supporting rural entrepreneurship," Proceedings – Rural and Agricultural Conferences, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Sep, pages 35-47.
    5. repec:oup:ajagec:v:99:y:2017:i:1:p:1-18. is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Vachal, Kimberly & Bitzan, John & Button, Kenneth, 2004. "Transportation Quality Indices for Economic Analysis of Non-Metropolitan Cities," UGPTI Department Publication 231813, North Dakota State University, Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute.
    7. Peterson, Steven K. & Jessup, Eric L., 2008. "Evaluating the Relationship Between Transportation Infrastructure and Economic Activity: Evidence from Washington State," Journal of the Transportation Research Forum, Transportation Research Forum, vol. 47(2).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Rural areas ; Rural development;

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