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Agriculture in the Uruguay Round: Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures

Author

Listed:
  • Petrey, L.A.
  • Johnson, R.W.M.

Abstract

In this paper the sanitary measures for the meat trade in Pacific Rim countries are assessed from the perspective of the current GATT negotiations on sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures. These negotiations include harmonisation of standards, greater transparency of domestic technical regulations, better risk assessment, promoting area freedom and improved dispute settlement procedures. It is concluded that greater coordination of SPS measures can overcome the potential misuse of some domestic policy sanitary instruments that impede international agricultural trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Petrey, L.A. & Johnson, R.W.M., 1993. "Agriculture in the Uruguay Round: Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 61(03), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:remaae:9626
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/9626
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. MacLaren, Donald, 1991. "Agriculture in the Uruguay Round: A Perspective from the Political Economy of Protectionism," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 59(01), April.
    2. North, Douglass C, 1987. "Institutions, Transaction Costs and Economic Growth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 25(3), pages 419-428, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Johnson, R.W.M., 1994. "The National Interest, Westminster, And Public Choice," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 38(01), April.
    2. Vande Kamp, Philip R. & Runge, C. Ford, 1994. "Trends and Developments in United States Agricultural Policy: 1993-1995," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 62(03), December.
    3. Henson, Spencer & Caswell, Julie, 1999. "Food safety regulation: an overview of contemporary issues," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 589-603, December.
    4. Henson, Spencer & Loader, Rupert, 2001. "Barriers to Agricultural Exports from Developing Countries: The Role of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Requirements," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 85-102, January.
    5. Wilson, John S. & Otsuki, Tsunehiro, 2001. "Global trade and food safety - winners and losers in a fragmented system," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2689, The World Bank.
    6. Hillman, Jimmye S., 1994. "The Uruguay Round: From Cold War To Cooperation In Negotiating Temperate-zone Agricultural And Trade Policies," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 62(02), August.
    7. Johnson, Robin & Hillman, Jimmye S. & Petrey, Allen, 2001. "Food Safety Issues, Protection And Trade (With Respect To Meat Products)," International Trade in Livestock Products Symposium, January 18-19, 2001, Auckland, New Zealand 14553, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.

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