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Targeting the Poor and Smallholder Farmers Empirical Evidence from Malawi

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  • Houssou, Nazaire
  • Zeller, Manfred

Abstract

The recent international financial crisis and the steady decrease in development assistance have put many poor countries under increasing pressure to target more accurately their public spendings at the poor and the population in need. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of accurate and operationally reliable methods for identifying the targeted population affected by poverty. Therefore, this paper develops low cost and fairly accurate models for improving the targeting efficiency of development policies. Using household-level survey data from Malawi, this research applies various econometric methods along with out-of-sample tests to develop operational poverty targeting models for the country. Though there is a scope for further improvements, the results show that the developed models can considerably improve the poverty outreach of development policies compared to the currently used targeting mechanisms in the country. Likewise, this research can be replicated in other developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Houssou, Nazaire & Zeller, Manfred, 0. "Targeting the Poor and Smallholder Farmers Empirical Evidence from Malawi," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 49.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:qjiage:155557
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ahmed, Akhter U. & Rashid, Shahidur & Sharma, Manohar & Zohir, Sajjad, 2004. "Food aid distribution in Bangladesh," FCND briefs 173, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Jonah B. Gelbach & Lant H. Pritchett, 2000. "Indicator targeting in a political economy: Leakier can be better," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 113-145.
    3. Wodon, Quentin T., 1997. "Targeting the poor using ROC curves," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 2083-2092, December.
    4. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "Do Fertilizer Subsidies Affect the Demand for Commercial Fertilizer? An Example from Malawi," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51606, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Grootaert, Christiaan & Braithwaite, Jeanine, 1998. "Poverty correlates and indicator-based targeting in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1942, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Houssou, Nazaire & Asante-Addo, Collins & Andam, Kwaw S., 2017. "Improving the targeting of fertilizer subsidy programs in Africa south of the Sahara: Perspectives from the Ghanaian experience," IFPRI discussion papers 1622, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    poverty targeting; predictions; Malawi; out-of-sample tests; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Food Security and Poverty; International Development; Political Economy; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods; C01; C13; I32;

    JEL classification:

    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics
    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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