IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/jintdv/v27y2015i4p546-563.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Do the Poor Pay More for Maize in Malawi?

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Mussa

Abstract

The paper uses data from the Third Integrated Household Survey to examine whether or not the poor pay more for maize in Malawi. The paper finds that the poor in rural and urban areas pay more for maize. It is found that the poor pay more for maize irrespective of when the maize is purchased. Thus, seasonality does not seem to be behind the observed poverty penalty. The paper finds that the poverty penalty varies with seasonality; it is significantly more pronounced in the post‐harvest period when maize is in abundance, it is, however, reduced in the lean season. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Mussa, 2015. "Do the Poor Pay More for Maize in Malawi?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 546-563, 05-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:27:y:2015:i:4:p:546-563
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2006. "Long term consequences of early childhood malnutrition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 450-474, July.
    2. Diansheng Dong & Harry M. Kaiser, 2005. "Coupon Redemption and Its Effect on Household Cheese Purchases," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 689-702.
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4381 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Crawford, Ian & Laisney, Francois & Preston, Ian, 2003. "Estimation of household demand systems with theoretically compatible Engel curves and unit value specifications," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 221-241, June.
    5. Baltagi, Badi H., 1981. "Simultaneous equations with error components," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 189-200, November.
    6. Rao, Vijayendra, 2000. "Price Heterogeneity and "Real" Inequality: A Case Study of Prices and Poverty in Rural South India," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(2), pages 201-211, June.
    7. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2007. "Life-Cycle Prices and Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(5), pages 1533-1559, December.
    8. Deaton, Angus, 1988. "Quality, Quantity, and Spatial Variation of Price," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 418-430, June.
    9. Gibson, John & Kim, Bonggeun, 2013. "Do the urban poor face higher food prices? Evidence from Vietnam," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 193-203.
    10. Ronald U. Mendoza, 2011. "Why do the poor pay more? Exploring the poverty penalty concept," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(1), pages 1-28, January.
    11. Christophe Muller, 2008. "The Measurement Of Poverty With Geographical And Intertemporal Price Dispersion: Evidence From Rwanda," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(1), pages 27-49, March.
    12. Timothy K.M. Beatty, 2010. "Do the Poor Pay More for Food?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(3), pages 608-621.
    13. Gunther, Isabel & Grimm, Michael, 2007. "Measuring pro-poor growth when relative prices shift," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 245-256, January.
    14. Smale, Melinda, 1995. ""Maize is life": Malawi's delayed Green Revolution," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 819-831, May.
    15. Muller, Christophe, 2002. "Prices and living standards: evidence for Rwanda," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 187-203, June.
    16. Ecker, Olivier & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Analyzing Nutritional Impacts of Policies: An Empirical Study for Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 412-428, March.
    17. World Bank, 2013. "Malawi Public Expenditure Review," World Bank Other Operational Studies 20586, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa & Bruno Martorano & Giovanni Andrea Cornia, "undated". "The Dynamics of Income Inequality in a Dualistic Economy: Malawi over 1990-2011," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2017-13, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    2. Stefan Öberg, 2016. "Did the Poor Pay More? Income-related variations in Diet and Food Quality among Urban Households in Sweden 1913-1914," Rivista di storia economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 211-248.
    3. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea & Martorano, Bruno, 2017. "Income Inequality Trends in sub-Saharan Africa: Divergence, determinants and consequences: The Dynamics of Income Inequality in a Dualistic Economy: Malawi over 1990-2011," UNDP Africa Reports 267648, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
    4. Brian Dillon & Joachim De Weerdt & Ted O’Donoghue, 2017. "Paying More For Less: Why Don't Households In Tanzania Take Advantage Of Bulk Discounts?," LICOS Discussion Papers 39617, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    5. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Bruno Martorano, "undated". "The dynamics of income inequality in a dualistic economy – Malawi," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2017-01, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    6. Mussa, Richard, 2017. "Long-term Effects of Early Life Maize Yield on Maize Productivity and Efficiency in Rural Malawi," MPRA Paper 75975, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. repec:rac:ecchap:2017-13 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:27:y:2015:i:4:p:546-563. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.