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Measuring pro-poor growth when relative prices shift

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  • Gunther, Isabel
  • Grimm, Michael

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  • Gunther, Isabel & Grimm, Michael, 2007. "Measuring pro-poor growth when relative prices shift," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 245-256, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:82:y:2007:i:1:p:245-256
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. S. J. Prais, 1959. "Whose Cost of Living?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(2), pages 126-134.
    2. Kilpatrick, Robert W, 1973. "The Income Elasticity of the Poverty Line," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 55(3), pages 327-332, August.
    3. Angus Deaton & Salman Zaidi, 2002. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14101.
    4. Michael Grimm, 2007. "Removing the anonymity axiom in assessing pro-poor growth," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 5(2), pages 179-197, August.
    5. Angus Deaton, 1998. "Getting Prices Right: What Should Be Done?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 37-46, Winter.
    6. Jantti, Markus & Danziger, Sheldon, 2000. "Income poverty in advanced countries," Handbook of Income Distribution,in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 6, pages 309-378 Elsevier.
    7. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2003. "Measuring pro-poor growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 93-99, January.
    8. Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1992. "Growth and redistribution components of changes in poverty measures : A decomposition with applications to Brazil and India in the 1980s," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 275-295, April.
    9. Slesnick, Daniel T, 1993. "Gaining Ground: Poverty in the Postwar United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 1-38, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ulrik Beck & Karl Pauw Author-Name:Richard Mussa, 2015. "Methods matter: The sensitivity of Malawian poverty estimates to definitions,data, and assumptions," WIDER Working Paper Series 126, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa, "undated". "Drivers of Income Inequality in Burkina Faso, Ghana and the United Republic of Tanzania: A comparative analysis," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2017-15, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    3. Grimm, Michael, 2011. "Does household income matter for children's schooling? Evidence for rural Sub-Saharan Africa," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 740-754, August.
    4. Amarante, Veronica & Vigorito, Andrea, 2011. "Uruguayâ..s Income Inequality and Political Regimes during 1981â..2010," WIDER Working Paper Series 094, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Channing Arndt & Sam Jones & Vincenzo Salvucci, 2015. "When do relative prices matter for measuring income inequality? The case of food prices in Mozambique," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(3), pages 449-464, September.
    6. Michael Grimm & Jörg Peters, 2015. "Beer, Wood, and Welfare," Ruhr Economic Papers 0538, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    7. Gaddis,Isis, 2016. "Prices for poverty analysis in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7652, The World Bank.
    8. Mussa, Richard, 2014. "Food Price Heterogeneity and Income Inequality in Malawi: Is Inequality Underestimated?," MPRA Paper 56080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Timmer, Peter & Weisbrod, Julian & McCulloch, Neil, 2006. "The Pathways out of Poverty in Rural Indonesia: an empirical assessment," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2006 29, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    10. Grimm, Michael & Peters, Jörg, 2014. "Beer, Wood, and Welfare," IZA Discussion Papers 8719, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
      • Grimm, Michael & Peters, Jörg, 2015. "Beer, Wood, and Welfare," Ruhr Economic Papers 538, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    11. repec:zbw:rwirep:0538 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Adriana Cardozo & Melanie Grosse, 2009. "Pro-Poor Growth Using Non-Income Indicators: An Empirical Illustration for Colombia," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 9, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    13. Richard Mussa, 2015. "Do the Poor Pay More for Maize in Malawi?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 546-563, 05-27.
    14. UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa, "undated". "Inequality and Growth in an Agricultural-led Development Model: The case of Ethiopia over 1995-2011," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2017-14, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    15. Grimm, Michael & Wetta, Claude & Nikiema, Aude, 2014. "Shipping around the Malthusian trap," WIDER Working Paper Series 124, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. Michael Grimm, 2008. "Food Price Inflation and Children's Schooling," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 844, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    17. Ulrik Beck, 2015. "Keep it real: Measuring real inequality using survey data from developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    18. Finn, Arden & Leibbrandt, Murray & Oosthuizen, Morne, 2014. "Poverty, inequality, and prices in post-apartheid South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 127, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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