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The Effectiveness of Dissemination Pathways on Adoption of “Push-Pull†Technology in Western Kenya

Author

Listed:
  • Murage, A. W.
  • Obare, Gideon A.
  • Chianu, J.
  • Amudavi, David Mulama
  • Midega, C. A. O.
  • Pickett, J. A.
  • Khan, Zeyaur R.

Abstract

Push-pull technology (PPT) is currently and widely promoted as a control measure for stemborers, Striga weed and soil fertility improvement in maize fields in western Kenya in order to improve on cereal production. Since it is a new and relatively knowledge-intensive technology, access information about its efficacy is critical for maximum adoption and continued use. Given that different technologies may need different pathways for adoption, this study sought to identify the most effective dissemination pathway(s) for scaling up the technology among many farmers. A two limit Tobit regression was used to analyze data from 491 respondents randomly selected from four districts in western Kenya. The results indicated that chronologically field days (FD), farmer field schools (FFS) and farmer teachers (FT), had the greatest impact on the probability that a farmer in the study area would adopt PPT and at enhanced intensity of adoption. Efforts to disseminate PPT should therefore target the use of demonstrations through field days to intensify adoption. FT and FFS where appropriate can be used as alternative pathways to reinforce extension messages.

Suggested Citation

  • Murage, A. W. & Obare, Gideon A. & Chianu, J. & Amudavi, David Mulama & Midega, C. A. O. & Pickett, J. A. & Khan, Zeyaur R., 0. "The Effectiveness of Dissemination Pathways on Adoption of “Push-Pull†Technology in Western Kenya," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 51.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:qjiage:155472
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    effectiveness; dissemination pathways; push-pull technology; uptake; Production Economics; Productivity Analysis; C41; D10; D80; O33; Q16;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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