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A Source-Differentiated Analysis of U.S. Meat Demand

  • Mutondo, Joao E.
  • Henneberry, Shida Rastegari
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    The Rotterdam model is used to estimate U.S. source-differentiated meat demand. Price and expenditure elasticities indicate that U.S. grain-fed beef and U.S. pork have a competitive advantage in the U.S. beef and pork markets, respectively. Expenditure elasticities reveal that beef from Canada has the most to gain from an expansion in U.S. meat expenditures, followed by ROW pork, U.S. grain-fed beef, and U.S. poultry. BSE outbreaks in Canada and the United States are shown to have small impacts on meat demand, while seasonality is found to have a significant effect in determining U.S. meat consumption patterns.

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    Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 03 (December)

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:7082
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    10. Tonsor, Glynn T. & Marsh, Thomas L., 2005. "Comparing Heterogeneous Consumption in US and Japanese Meat and Fish Demand," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19567, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    13. Muhammad, Andrew & Jones, Keithly G. & Hahn, William F., 2004. "U.S. Demand For Imported Lamb By Country: A Two-Stage Differential Production Approach," 2004 Annual Meeting, February 14-18, 2004, Tulsa, Oklahoma 34690, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
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    15. Mdafri, Abdellah & Brorsen, B. Wade, 1993. "Demand for red meat, poultry, and fish in Morocco: an almost ideal demand system," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(2), August.
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