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Fertilizer use on individually and jointly managed crop plots in Mozambique

Author

Listed:
  • Marenya, Paswel
  • Kassie, Menale
  • Tostao, Emilio

Abstract

Using plot level data, this study examines the differential fertilizer application rates on plots managed individually by men, women, or jointly in dual adult households in three districts in south-central Mozambique. The results suggest that—controlling for the demographics of the manager and plot characteristics—joint management of agricultural plots is associated with higher fertilizer application rates on maize plots but with lower fertilizer application on non-food cash plots. Absent equitable sharing of proceeds from jointly managed plots, efforts to increase access to inputs by women may need to be targeted at plots already managed by women themselves. In land-scarce environments where women are less likely to have parcels to cultivate autonomously, these results suggest that improving women’s bargaining power under joint management of agricultural activities may be one way to improve gender equality in agriculture.

Suggested Citation

  • Marenya, Paswel & Kassie, Menale & Tostao, Emilio, 2015. "Fertilizer use on individually and jointly managed crop plots in Mozambique," Journal of Gender, Agriculture and Food Security (Agri-Gender), Africa Centre for Gender, Social Research and Impact Assessment, vol. 1(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:afgend:246050
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/246050/files/OCT%202015%20Vol%201%20issue%202%20Paper%204.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Maligalig, Rio L. & Demont, Matty & Umberger, Wendy J. & Peralta, Alexandra, 2017. "Intrahousehold decision making on rice varietal trait improvements: Using experiments to estimate gender influence," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258522, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0783-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Theriault, Veronique & Smale, Melinda & Haider, Hamza, 2017. "How Does Gender Affect Sustainable Intensification of Cereal Production in the West African Sahel? Evidence from Burkina Faso," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 177-191.
    4. Machina, Henry & Ngoma, Hambulo & Kuteya, Aukland, 2017. "Gendered impacts of agricultural subsidies in Zambia," MPRA Paper 87099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. João Morgado & Vincenzo Salvucci, 2016. "Gender divide in agricultural productivity in Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 176, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Seymour, Greg & Doss, Cheryl & Marenya, Paswel & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Passarelli, Simone, "undated". "Women’s Empowerment and the Adoption of Improved Maize Varieties: Evidence from Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 236164, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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