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Marital Status, Household Size and Poverty in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2009/2010 Survey Data

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  • John Anyanwu

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Abstract

This paper examines the effect of marital status and household size, among other correlates, on poverty in Nigeria, using the Harmonized Nigeria Living Standard Survey (HNLSS) data of 2009/2010. Our logit results show that monogamous marriage, divorce/separation and widowhood are negatively and significantly correlated with the probability of being poor. However, monogamous marriage has the largest probability of reducing poverty in Nigeria. We also find that household size matters in determining poverty in the country: a one-person household negatively and significantly reduces poverty while addition of members to the household progressively increases the probability of being poor. In addition, our results show that there is a significant concave (inverted U-shaped) relationship between age and poverty. Other variables found to significantly reduce the probability of being poor include: being a male, completion of post-secondary education, being in paid household employment, and residence in the North Central and South East geopolitical zones. Variables that increase the probability of being poor in Nigeria include rural residence, possessing no education, being a self-employed farmer, and residence in the North West geopolitical zone of the country.

Suggested Citation

  • John Anyanwu, 2014. "Marital Status, Household Size and Poverty in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2009/2010 Survey Data," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 118-137.
  • Handle: RePEc:adb:adbadr:2121
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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice A. & Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2017. "Mobile banking usage, quality of growth, inequality and poverty in developing countries," Working Papers 23396, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    2. Asongu, Simplice & Tchamyou, Vanessa, 2015. "Inequality, Finance and Pro-Poor Investment in Africa," MPRA Paper 71171, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2018. "Recent finance advances in information technology for inclusive development: a systematic review," Netnomics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 65-93, October.
    4. Simplice Asongu & Ndemaze Asongu, 2018. "The comparative exploration of mobile money services in inclusive development," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 45(1), pages 124-139, January.
    5. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Recent finance advances in information technology for inclusive development: a survey," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/009, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    6. Asongu, Simplice & Asongu, Ndemaze, 2017. "Comparative Determinants of Quality of Growth in Developing Countries," MPRA Paper 80650, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Not all that glitters is gold: ICT and inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," International Journal of Happiness and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(4), pages 303-322.
    8. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2015. "Finance and Inclusive Human Development: Evidence from Africa," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 15/061, African Governance and Development Institute..
    9. Kazeem B. Ajide & Olorunfemi Y. Alimi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2019. "Ethnic Diversity and Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Do Institutions Reduce the Noise?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 145(3), pages 1033-1062, October.
    10. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2015. "Welfare Spending and Quality of Growth in Developing Countries: Evidence from Hopefuls, Contenders and Best Performers," Research Africa Network Working Papers 15/022, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    11. Asongu, Simplice & Uduji, Joseph & Okolo-Obasi, Elda, 2019. "Thresholds of External Flows for Inclusive Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 101521, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nwachukwu, Jacinta C., 2017. "Quality of Growth Empirics: Comparative gaps, benchmarking and policy syndromes," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 861-882.
    13. Oznur Ozdamar & Eleftherios Giovanis, 2019. "Youth Multidimensional Poverty and Its Dynamics: Evidence From Selected Countries In The Mena Region," Working Papers 1339, Economic Research Forum, revised 21 Aug 2019.
    14. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2015. "On the Empirics of Institutions and Quality of Growth: Evidence for Developing Countries," Research Africa Network Working Papers 15/041, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    15. Asongu, Simplice & Nwachukwu, Jacinta, 2017. "Comparative human development thresholds for absolute and relative pro-poor mobile banking in developing countries," MPRA Paper 79636, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Simplice Asongu, 2016. "Reinventing Foreign Aid For Inclusive And Sustainable Development: Kuznets, Piketty And The Great Policy Reversal," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(4), pages 736-755, September.
    17. Simplice A. Asongu & Ivo J. Leke, 2019. "External flows and inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," International Journal of Happiness and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(1), pages 33-56.
    18. Pécastaing, Nicolas & Dávalos, Jorge & Inga, Andy, 2018. "The effect of Peru's CDM investments on households’ welfare: An econometric approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 198-207.
    19. Simplice A. Asongu & Lieven De Moor, 2015. "Recent advances in finance for inclusive development: a survey," Research Africa Network Working Papers 15/005, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    20. Asongu, Simplice, 2014. "Reinventing foreign aid for inclusive and sustainable development: a survey," MPRA Paper 65300, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Onipede Wusu & Emmanuel O. Amoo, 2016. "Fertility Behaviour and Wealth Situation in Nigeria: Evidence from 2013 Demographic and Health Survey," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 1-14, August.
    22. John Gibson & Omoniyi Alimi, 2020. "Measuring poverty with noisy and corrected estimates of annual consumption: Evidence from Nigeria," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 32(1), pages 96-107, March.
    23. Deniz Sevinc, 2020. "How Poor is Poor? A novel look at multidimensional poverty in the UK," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 833-859, June.

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