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An analysis of food security and poverty in Central Asia-case study from Kazakhstan

Author

Listed:
  • Valerie Rhoe

    (International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, DC, USA)

  • Suresh Babu

    (International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, DC, USA)

  • William Reidhead

    (WWF-International, Gland, Switzerland)

Abstract

During the transition from planned to market-oriented economies, Central Asian countries experienced major socio-economic shocks that increased food insecurity, malnutrition and poverty. In the last 15 years, these countries underwent economic reforms in order to transform their economies, and in response to growing food insecurity and poverty levels, they adopted food self-sufficiency policies. For designing and implementing policy reforms, a good understanding of the magnitude of food insecurity and poverty and their determinants are required. Using the Kazakhstan Living Standard and Measurement Survey, this paper identifies a food poverty line and a total poverty line for Kazakhstan. Then poverty measures from both lines are compared and determinates of poverty are analysed. The results show that the total poverty line captures more of the poor population. Although there are some variations amongst the determinants of poverty under the two poverty lines, the strength of the common determinants is generally weaker when non-food expenditures are included in deriving the poverty line. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Valerie Rhoe & Suresh Babu & William Reidhead, 2008. "An analysis of food security and poverty in Central Asia-case study from Kazakhstan," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 452-465.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:20:y:2008:i:4:p:452-465
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1421
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1421
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    2. Pandya-Lorch, Rajul & Rosegrant, Mark W., 2000. "Prospects for food demand and supply in Central Asia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 637-646, December.
    3. Coulombe, Harold & Mckay, Andrew, 1996. "Modeling determinants of poverty in Mauritania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1015-1031, June.
    4. Sen, Amartya K, 1976. "Poverty: An Ordinal Approach to Measurement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(2), pages 219-231, March.
    5. Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1986. "A methodology for measuring food poverty applied to Kenya," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 59-74, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brück, Tilman & Esenaliev, Damir & Kroeger, Antje & Kudebayeva, Alma & Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Steiner, Susan, 2014. "Household survey data for research on well-being and behavior in Central Asia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 819-835.
    2. John C. Anyanwu, 2014. "Marital Status, Household Size and Poverty in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2009/2010 Survey Data," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 118-137, March.
    3. Maharjan, Keshav Lall & Joshi, Niraj Prakash, 2009. "Relationship between Income-poverty and Food insecurity in Rural Far-western Mid-hills of Nepal," MPRA Paper 35378, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. John Anyanwu, 2013. "Working Paper 180 - Marital Status, Household Size and Poverty in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2009-2010 Survey Data," Working Paper Series 978, African Development Bank.
    5. Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2015. "Research on Poverty in Transition Economies: A Meta-analysis on Changes in the Determinants of Poverty," RRC Working Paper Series 51, Russian Research Center, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Alma Kudebayeva, 2012. "Effects of Crisis on Income and Poverty: The Case of Kazakhstan," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 102, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    7. John Anyanwu, 2012. "Working Paper 149 - Accounting for Poverty in Africa: Illustration with Survey Data from Nigeria," Working Paper Series 383, African Development Bank.

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