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Poverty And Access To Infrastructure In Papua New Guinea

Author

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  • Gibson, John
  • Rozelle, Scott

Abstract

In this paper, our overall goal is to understand how effective access to infrastructure is in reducing poverty in PNG. To meet this goal, we examine poverty in PNG, and seek to show the relationship between poverty and access to infrastructure and then identify the determinants of poverty. In our analysis, we test whether or not access to infrastructure is a significant factor in a household's poverty status. Finally, we want to understand what policies will be effective in overcoming poverty in PNG. Our results show that poverty in PNG is primarily rural and is associated with those in communities with poor access to services, markets, and transportation. Our simulations illustrate that improving access to school leads to large declines in poverty. Increasing access to poverty for those that are currently most isolated would have a significant effect in decreasing the severity of poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Gibson, John & Rozelle, Scott, 2002. "Poverty And Access To Infrastructure In Papua New Guinea," Working Papers 11944, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ucdavw:11944
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11944
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1986. "On Measuring Child Costs: With Applications to Poor Countries," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(4), pages 720-744, August.
    3. Shenggen Fan & Peter Hazell & Sukhadeo Thorat, 2000. "Government Spending, Growth and Poverty in Rural India," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1038-1051.
    4. Lanjouw, Peter & Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Poverty and Household Size," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(433), pages 1415-1434, November.
    5. Lipton, Michael & Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Poverty and policy," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 2551-2657 Elsevier.
    6. John Gibson, 1998. "Identifying the poor for efficient targeting: Results for papua new guinea," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 1-18.
    7. Binswanger, Hans P. & Khandker, Shahidur R. & Rosenzweig, Mark R., 1993. "How infrastructure and financial institutions affect agricultural output and investment in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 337-366, August.
    8. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-766, May.
    9. Datt, Gaurav & Jolliffe, Dean, 1999. "Determinants of poverty in Egypt, 1997," FCND discussion papers 75, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Datt, Gaurav & Jolliffe, Dean, 1999. "Determinants of Poverty in Egypt," FCND briefs 2, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Blackorby, Charles & Donaldson, David, 1987. "Welfare ratios and distributionally sensitive cost-benefit analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 265-290, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Dornan, 2016. "The Political Economy of Road Management Reform: Papua New Guinea's National Road Fund," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 443-457, September.
    2. Sebaggala, Richard & Okello, Patrick, 2010. "An Econometric Analysis Of The Link Between Access To Agricultural Extension Services, Adoption Of Agricultural Technology And Poverty: Evidence For Uganda," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124622, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Tauisi Taupo & Harold Cuffe & Ilan Noy, 2016. "Household Vulnerability on the Frontline of Climate Change: The Pacific Atoll Nation of Tuvalu," CESifo Working Paper Series 6128, CESifo Group Munich.

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