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An Econometric Analysis Of The Link Between Access To Agricultural Extension Services, Adoption Of Agricultural Technology And Poverty: Evidence For Uganda

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  • Sebaggala, Richard
  • Okello, Patrick

Abstract

Overall, the study investigated the impact of access to and adoption of extension services and agricultural technology in reducing poverty in Uganda. To meet this objective, the researcher analysed the relationship between poverty and access to agricultural extension services and adoption of agricultural technology. A bivariate and multivariate approach was employed to determine whether access to and adoption of agricultural technology are significant factors in influencing the household poverty in Uganda. The results revealed that there is a significant but weak, relationship between poverty and access to agricultural extension and adoption of agricultural technology, and that poor households have the least access to agricultural extension services and low adoption of agricultural technology. The simulation results showed that improving access to agricultural extension and adoption of agricultural technology result into reduction in probability of being poor. Furthermore, on average access to extension services and adoption of agricultural technology is still very poor among the poor and non-poor Ugandans. High on the priority agenda should be concerted efforts to intensify accessibility to agricultural extension services and adoption of agricultural technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Sebaggala, Richard & Okello, Patrick, 2010. "An Econometric Analysis Of The Link Between Access To Agricultural Extension Services, Adoption Of Agricultural Technology And Poverty: Evidence For Uganda," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124622, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:124622
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.124622
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/124622/files/AN%20ECONOMETRIC%20ANALYSIS.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gaurav Datt & Martin Ravallion, 1998. "Farm productivity and rural poverty in India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 62-85.
    2. Gibson, John & Rozelle, Scott, 2002. "Poverty And Access To Infrastructure In Papua New Guinea," Working Papers 11944, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    3. Gibson, John & Rozelle, Scott, 2003. "Poverty and Access to Roads in Papua New Guinea," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 159-185, October.
    4. Garza-Rodriguez, Jorge, 2002. "The determinants of poverty in Mexico," MPRA Paper 65993, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Birner, Regina & Anderson, Jock R., 2007. "How to make agricultural extension demand-driven?: The case of India's agricultural extension policy," IFPRI discussion papers 729, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Barrett, C. B. & Reardon, T. & Webb, P., 2001. "Nonfarm income diversification and household livelihood strategies in rural Africa: concepts, dynamics, and policy implications," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 315-331, August.
    7. Christopher B. Barrett & Paul A. Dorosh, 1996. "Farmers' Welfare and Changing Food Prices: Nonparametric Evidence from Rice in Madagascar," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 656-669.
    8. Geda, A. & de Jong, N. & Mwabu, G. & Kimenyi, M.S., 2001. "Determinants of poverty in Kenya : a household level analysis," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19095, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
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    Keywords

    Community/Rural/Urban Development;

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