IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/vuw/vuwecf/5319.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Household vulnerability on the frontline of climate change: The Pacific atoll nation of Tuvalu

Author

Listed:
  • Taupo, Tauisi
  • Cuffe, Harold
  • Noy, Ilan

Abstract

This paper investigates the vulnerability of households to climatic disasters in the low-lying atoll nation of Tuvalu. Small Island Developing States, particularly the atoll islands, are considered to be the most vulnerable to climatic change, and in particular to sea-level rise and its associated risks. We construct poverty and hardship profiles for households on the different islands of Tuvalu, and combine these with geographic and topographic information to assess the exposure differentials among different groups using spatial econometric models. Besides the observation that poor households are more vulnerable to negative shocks because they lack the resources to respond, we also find that they are also more likely to reside in highly exposed areas to disasters (closer to the coasts and at lower elevation) and have less ability to migrate (between and within the islands).

Suggested Citation

  • Taupo, Tauisi & Cuffe, Harold & Noy, Ilan, 2016. "Household vulnerability on the frontline of climate change: The Pacific atoll nation of Tuvalu," Working Paper Series 5319, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:vuw:vuwecf:5319
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://researcharchive.vuw.ac.nz/handle/10063/5319
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ravallion, Martin, 1996. "How Well Can Method Substitute for Data? Five Experiments in Poverty Analysis," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 11(2), pages 199-221, August.
    2. Ezequiel Cabezon & Leni Hunter & Patrizia Tumbarello & Kazuaki Washimi & Yiqun Wu, 2019. "Enhancing macroeconomic resilience to natural disasters and climate change in the small states of the Pacific," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 33(1), pages 113-130, May.
    3. Qu, Xi & Lee, Lung-fei, 2012. "LM tests for spatial correlation in spatial models with limited dependent variables," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 430-445.
    4. Ilan Noy, 2016. "Natural disasters in the Pacific Island Countries: new measurements of impacts," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 84(1), pages 7-18, November.
    5. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2007. "Using Global Positioning Systems in Household Surveys for Better Economics and Better Policy," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 217-241, September.
    6. World Bank & United Nations, 2010. "Natural Hazards, UnNatural Disasters : The Economics of Effective Prevention," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2512, June.
    7. Ilan Noy, 2017. "To Leave or Not to Leave? Climate Change, Exit, and Voice on a Pacific Island," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 403-420.
    8. Ravallion, Martin, 1996. "Issues in Measuring and Modelling Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1328-1343, September.
    9. Menno Pradhan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Measuring Poverty Using Qualitative Perceptions Of Consumption Adequacy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 462-471, August.
    10. Olivia, Susan & Gibson, John & Rozelle, Scott & Huang, Jikun & Deng, Xiangzheng, 2011. "Mapping poverty in rural China: how much does the environment matter?," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 129-153, April.
    11. Anselin, Luc & Bera, Anil K. & Florax, Raymond & Yoon, Mann J., 1996. "Simple diagnostic tests for spatial dependence," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 77-104, February.
    12. Raghbendra JHA & Tu DANG & Krishna Lal SHARMA, 2009. "Vulnerability to poverty in Fiji," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(1).
    13. Stefan Dercon, 2005. "Risk, Poverty and Vulnerability in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(4), pages 483-488, December.
    14. Gibson, John & Rozelle, Scott, 2002. "Poverty And Access To Infrastructure In Papua New Guinea," Working Papers 11944, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    15. Indranil Dutta & James Foster & Ajit Mishra, 2011. "On measuring vulnerability to poverty," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 37(4), pages 743-761, October.
    16. Olivia, Susan & Gibson, John & Smith, Aaron D. & Rozelle, Scott & Deng, Xiangzheng, 2009. "An Empirical Evaluation of Poverty Mapping Methodology: Explicitly Spatial versus Implicitly Spatial Approach," 2009 Conference (53rd), February 11-13, 2009, Cairns, Australia 47651, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    17. World Bank, 2007. "Poverty and Environment : Understanding Linkages at the Household Level," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6924, June.
    18. Ravallion, M., 1998. "Poverty Lines in Theory and Practice," Papers 133, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
    19. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Are there dynamic gains from a poor-area development program?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 65-85, January.
    20. Stephane Hallegatte & Mook Bangalore & Laura Bonzanigo & Marianne Fay & Tamaro Kane & Ulf Narloch & Julie Rozenberg & David Treguer & Adrien Vogt-Schilb, 2016. "Shock Waves," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22787, June.
    21. Raghbendra Jha & Tu Dang, 2010. "Vulnerability to Poverty in Papua New Guinea in 1996," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 235-251, September.
    22. Cavallo, Eduardo & Noy, Ilan, 2011. "Natural Disasters and the Economy — A Survey," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 5(1), pages 63-102, May.
    23. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2007. "Using Global Positioning Systems in Household Surveys for Better Economics and Better Policy," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 217-241, September.
    24. Susanne Milcher, 2010. "Household vulnerability estimates of Roma in Southeast Europe," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(4), pages 773-792.
    25. World Bank, 2007. "Poverty and Environment : Understanding Linkages at the Household Level," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7744, The World Bank.
    26. Aisha Dasgupta & Angela Baschieri, 2010. "Vulnerability to climate change in rural Ghana: Mainstreaming climate change in poverty-reduction strategies," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(6), pages 803-820.
    27. Jonathan Haughton & Shahidur R. Khandker, 2009. "Handbook on Poverty and Inequality," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11985, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tauisi Taupo & Ilan Noy, 2017. "At the Very Edge of a Storm: The Impact of a Distant Cyclone on Atoll Islands," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 143-166, July.
    2. Ilan Noy, 2017. "To Leave or Not to Leave? Climate Change, Exit, and Voice on a Pacific Island," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 403-420.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Vulnerability; Exposure; Poverty; Hardship; Tuvalu; Atoll;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:vuw:vuwecf:5319. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Library Technology Services). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/egvuwnz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.