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Equilibrium Play and Best Response in Sequential Constant Sum Games

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  • Pedro Rey Biel

    (University College London)

Abstract

We perform a further experiment to check the robustness of the main result in Rey Biel (2005) to sequential play. We find that Equilibrium predictions work even better when the same games are played sequentially: 85% of first movers choose the Equilibrium strategy and 85% of second movers best respond to the action taken by first movers. We conclude by identifying constant sum games as a class of games where experimental subjects' choices coincide with theory predictions and we argue that in such games distributional and reciprocal preferences do not influence subjects' decisions.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/exp/papers/0506/0506004.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Experimental with number 0506004.

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Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: 08 Jun 2005
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Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpex:0506004

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 17
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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Keywords: Experiments; Constant Sum Games; Best Response;

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