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Equilibrium PLay and Best Response to (Stated) Beliefs in Constant Sum Games

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  • Pedro Rey Biel

    (University College London)

Abstract

In a laboratory experiment, subjects played ten two-person 3x3 constant sum games and stated beliefs about the frequencies of play by their opponents. Contrary to previous experimental evidence, game-theoretical predictions work well: 80% of actions coincided with Nash equilibrium, subjects were good at predicting the action which was played with highest frequency and 73% of actions taken were best responses to stated beliefs. Complexity, measured by the necessary number of rounds of iterated deletion of dominated strategies to reach the equilibrium, did not affect behavior, although whether games were dominance solvable had an effect. We discuss possible reasons why results differ when the games and the experimental procedures are changed.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/exp/papers/0506/0506003.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Experimental with number 0506003.

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Length: 50 pages
Date of creation: 08 Jun 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpex:0506003

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 50
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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Keywords: Experiments; Constant Sum Games; Belielfs;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dietmar Fehr & Dorothea Kübler & David Danz, 2010. "Information and Beliefs in a Repeated Normal-form Game," CIG Working Papers SP II 2010-02, Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB), Research Unit: Competition and Innovation (CIG).
  2. ATTANASI Giuseppe & NAGEL Rosemarie, 2008. "A Survey of Psychological Games: Theoretical Findings and Experimental Evidence," LERNA Working Papers 08.07.251, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
  3. Gallice, Andrea, 2007. "Best Responding to What? A Behavioral Approach to One Shot Play in 2x2 Games," Discussion Papers in Economics 1365, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  4. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2009. "Neural networks as a learning paradigm for general normal form games," MPRA Paper 16765, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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