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Does Minimax Work? An Experimental Study

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  • Binmore, Ken
  • Swierzbinski, Joe
  • Proulx, Chris
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    Abstract

    This paper finds experimental support for Von Neumann's minimax theory in two-person, zero-sum games.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

    Volume (Year): 111 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 473 (July)
    Pages: 445-64

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    Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:111:y:2001:i:473:p:445-64

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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Feltovich, Nick & Swierzbinski, Joe, 2011. "The role of strategic uncertainty in games: An experimental study of cheap talk and contracts in the Nash demand game," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 554-574, May.
    2. Colin F. Camerer & Teck-Hua Ho & Juin-Kuan Chong, 2004. "A Cognitive Hierarchy Model of Games," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(3), pages 861-898, August.
    3. Pedro Rey Biel, 2005. "Equilibrium Play and Best Response in Sequential Constant Sum Games," Experimental 0506004, EconWPA.
    4. Ehud Guttel & Barak Medina, 2007. "Less Crime, More (Vulnerable) Victims: Game Theory and the Distributional Effects of Criminal Sanctions," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000001799, UCLA Department of Economics.
    5. Pedro Rey-Biel, 2005. "Equilibrium Play and Best Reply to (Stated) Beliefs in Constant Sum Games," Experimental 0512003, EconWPA.
    6. Jason Shachat & J. Todd Swarthout & Lijia Wei, 2012. "A hidden Markov model for the detection of pure and mixed strategy play in games," Experimental Economics Center Working Paper Series 2012-11, Experimental Economics Center, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    7. Morgan, John & Orzen, Henrik & Sefton, Martin, 2006. "An experimental study of price dispersion," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 134-158, January.
    8. Antonio Cabrales & Jose Ramon Uriarte, 2008. "Doubts and equilibria," Economics Working Papers we080905, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
      • Cabrales, Antonio & Uriarte Ayo, José Ramón, 2007. "Doubts and Equilibria," IKERLANAK 2008-31, Universidad del País Vasco - Departamento de Fundamentos del Análisis Económico I.
    9. Friedman, Eric & Shor, Mikhael & Shenker, Scott & Sopher, Barry, 2004. "An experiment on learning with limited information: nonconvergence, experimentation cascades, and the advantage of being slow," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 325-352, May.
    10. Robert W. Rosenthal & Jason Shachat & Mark Walker, 2003. "Hide and seek in Arizona," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 273-293, December.
    11. Pedro Rey Biel, 2005. "Equilibrium PLay and Best Response to (Stated) Beliefs in Constant Sum Games," Experimental 0506003, EconWPA.
    12. Ehud Guttel & Barak Medina, 2007. "Less Crime, More (Vulnerable) Victims: Game Theory and the Distributional Effects of Criminal Sanctions," Discussion Paper Series dp472, The Center for the Study of Rationality, Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
    13. Spiliopoulos, Leonidas, 2012. "Pattern recognition and subjective belief learning in a repeated constant-sum game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 921-935.
    14. Henrick Orzen & John Morgan & Martin Sefton, 2004. "A Laboratory Study Of Advertising And Price Competition," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 76, Royal Economic Society.
    15. repec:fee:wpaper:1101 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Rapoport, Amnon & Stein, William E. & Parco, James E. & Nicholas, Thomas E., 2003. "Equilibrium play and adaptive learning in a three-person centipede game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 239-265, May.
    17. Okano, Yoshitaka, 2013. "Minimax play by teams," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 168-180.

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