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Use of data on planned contributions and stated beliefs in the measurement of social preferences

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  • Anna Conte

    (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena, and University of Westminster, EQM Department, London)

  • M. Vittoria Levati

    ()
    (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena, and University of Verona, Department of Economics)

Abstract

In a series of one-shot linear public goods game, we ask subjects to report their contributions, their contribution plans for the next period, and their first-order beliefs about their present and future partner. We estimate subjects' preferences from plans data by a finite mixture approach and compare the results with those obtained from contribution data. Our results indicate that preferences are heterogeneous, and that most subjects exhibit conditionally cooperative inclinations. Controlling for beliefs, which incorporate the information about the other's decisions, we are able to show that plans convey accurate information about subjects' preferences and, consequently, are good predictors of their future behavior.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics in its series Jena Economic Research Papers with number 2011-039.

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Date of creation: 13 Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2011-039

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Keywords: Public good experiments; Social preferences; Mixture models;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Conte, Anna & Levati, Vittoria & Montinari, Natalia, 2014. "Experience in Public Goods Experiments," Working Papers 2014:20, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  2. Anna Conte & Peter G. Moffatt, 2010. "The econometric modeling of social Preferences," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-042, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
  3. Anna Contea & Daniela T. Di Cagno & Emanuela Sciubbad, 2011. "Behavioural patterns in social networks," Jena Economic Research Papers 2011-060, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.

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