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Social Divisions in School Participation and Attainment in India: 1983-2004

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Author Info

  • Asadullah, Niaz

    ()
    (University of Reading)

  • Kambhampati, Uma

    ()
    (University of Reading)

  • López Bóo, Florencia

    ()
    (Inter-American Development Bank)

Abstract

This study documents the size and nature of "Hindu-Muslim" and "boy-girl" gaps in children's school participation and attainments in India. Individual-level data from two successive rounds of the National Sample Survey suggest that considerable progress has been made in decreasing the Hindu-Muslim gap. Nonetheless, the gap remains sizable even after controlling for numerous socio-economic and parental covariates, and the Muslim educational disadvantage in India today is greater than that experienced by girls and Scheduled Caste Hindu children. A gender gap still appears within as well as between communities, though it is smaller within Muslim communities. While differences in gender and other demographic and socio-economic covariates have recently become more important in explaining the Hindu-Muslim gap, those differences altogether explain only 25 percent to 45 percent of the observed schooling gap.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6329.

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Length: 49 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Cambridge Journal of Economics, 2013, [Online First]
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6329

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Keywords: gender inequality; religion; India; social disparity;

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References

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  1. Jean Dreze & Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, 1999. "School Participation in Rural India," Working papers 69, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Florencia Lopez Boo & Maria E. Canon, 2012. "Richer but more unequal? nutrition and caste gaps," Working Papers 2012-051, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

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