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Religion and education gender gap: Are Muslims different?

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  • Mandana, Hajj
  • Panizza, Ugo

Abstract

This paper uses individual-level data and a differences in differences estimation strategy to test whether the education gender gap of Muslims is different from that of Christians. In particular, the paper uses data for young Lebanese and shows that, other things equal, girls (both Muslim and Christian) tend to receive more education than boys and that there is no difference between the education gender gap of Muslims and Christians. Therefore, the paper finds no support for the hypothesis that Muslims discriminate against female education.

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File URL: http://polis.unipmn.it/pubbl/RePEc/uca/ucapdv/panizza70.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS in its series POLIS Working Papers with number 64.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uca:ucapdv:64

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Web page: http://polis.unipmn.it

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Keywords: Religion; Islam; Education; Gender Gap;

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  13. Gruber Jonathan H, 2005. "Religious Market Structure, Religious Participation, and Outcomes: Is Religion Good for You?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-32, September.
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  15. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Introduction to the Economics of Religion," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1465-1495, September.
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